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Author Topic: Walking  (Read 1823 times)

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jjiam

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Walking
« on: October 18, 2007, 10:20:46 PM »
Hey it's me with another question, it is now 5 weeks and 2 days post op.  The pain is gone from walking, now I just get sore, but am walking with one cane.  That being said, I can walk without the cane, but its very very sore, and takes alot of concentrating.  So my question is that when you guys got rid of your one crutch, did you walk perfectly or did you have a limp still?  I'm so used to limping to avoid the pain, I find myself doing that when I try without crutch.  Maybe that is because I was so used to limping before the surgery to avoid the pain.  Anyway, I had a hip arthroscopy in January 07, and got my hip resurfaced Sep 07, so that is why I might be healing slower, I mean that is twice in 9 months my hip was dislocated, that and the healing again after this surgery like I did with the arthroscopy.

Pat Walter

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Re: Walking
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2007, 12:17:31 AM »
Hi
At 5 weeks your are still in post op recovery.  I was told very clearly that I should continue to use a crutch or cane as long as I limped.   Marc the PT in Belgium actually took my crutch away one day and said walk.  I was able to walk, but it was a little painful and I really limped.  He said - that's the test.  When you can walk without a limp and pain - you are ready to be without a crutch or cane.

Maybe you are still pushing too much.  Try walking without the cane or crutch for a while, then go back to using it.  Go on and off.  I use to do that. Just carry it with me.  I would say, remember I am not medically trained, that if you are still limping that you are not ready to lose the cane.  5 weeks post op is still early in the game.

You should try to walk heel to toe and as normal as possible.  Concentrate on the walk and have an even stride.  Using the cane or crutch won't hurt for awhile longer. You will actually get so you won't think about the crutch or cane - then you won't need it.  If you are really still concerned about it - you probably should be using it.

Your body has a lot of healing to do. I was without the crutch at 4 weeks, but some used it for months.  Only your body can determine when the time is right to stop using it.
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jjiam

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Re: Walking
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2007, 05:32:12 AM »
Thanks so much for keeping my mind at ease.  I know my body is still probably healing from the arthroscopy, and that's why.  I can bicycle decent, almost almost to the point at trying my racing bike out.  I am just using a hybrid bike on a trainer, and can do it for 20 minutes, with weight. So the worst thing I can't do yet is obviously walk correctly, but also still can't pull my leg up to put on my socks and shoes.  That's why I might have trouble with my racing bike, because of "clipping" in.  You need to twist your heel out to get out of the pedals, but I am almost afraid to try it, incase I forget to unclip(It's not hard when you haven't ridden in awhile), and boom fall over on my right side.  It doesn't seem to pretty to me.  I am so close, but I think your right Pat, I will use my crutch until I can walk correctly, at least with the crutch my gait is fine.
My doctor said I was only his 12th patient for re-surfacing, so I think he did a pretty good job on me.  I am very strong with some things, but those two are coming slowly!

Pat Walter

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Re: Walking
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2007, 11:15:01 AM »
I waited almost 6 months to ride my mountain bike.  It was not a racing bike with drop handles or clip toes.  My biggest fear was that if I fell - I would injure my hip. Dr. De Smet said I coud ride much earlier, but I was afraid of doing any harm to my new hip from the fall.  Of course, again, I am a 61 year old woman, and am much more conservative than you. 

I would not be doing any clipping in for a long time.  I remember reading about someone that used the toe clips and fell.  They were fortunate not to hurt the hip, but were very sore and upset about the fall.

I think you best gage is going to be when you can walk long and far without a crutch - normal gaite with head held high and shoulders back - you will be ready to try more adventurous things like the racing bike.

Think how terrible it would be to gamble this nice new hip for a bike ride.  A fall could mean a revision to a thr!  Be careful until you are healed.  Walk, hike, hill climb - but use your hips and legs with your feet on the ground.  You will get strong in a few more months.

Pat
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3/15/06 LBHR De Smet

Liz

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Re: Walking
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2007, 09:10:03 AM »
Hi

I stopped using my crutch at about 6 weeks. I realised I was getting terrible back pain from using one crutch and so practiced concentrating hard on not putting my weight on the crutch when out walking for a day or two. Once I could basically walk without the crutch I dropped it and went from strength to strength. I didn't really get pain in my leg, I had just forgotten how to walk without limping so it was hard work concentrating on every step, but it soon became normal. It is a great sense of freedom to go out without crutches. I had them for so long pre op ( 2 years) I sometimes feel as if I am missing something when I go out.... It does leave me more hands for shopping though! Not sure the bank manager thinks that is a good thing :)

I still get stiff when I first get out of a chair if I have been sitting for ages and limp for a couple of steps, but quickly loosen up and I'm off. I am just 3 months post op now.

Just listen to your body, if it feels right it is!

Liz

coskater

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Re: Walking
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2007, 04:23:17 PM »
I must admit I am starting to like walking, I manage 2 miles a day and will continue to use my crutches until 6 weeks, my restrictions are different from the norm but still similar, I am also limited to 2 to 2 1/2 miles a day.  I try to walk with good posture, and an even stride, I am working on making sure my back swing on my operated leg is as good as my left leg. I am using one cane around the house especially when I need to carry things but otherwise I stay within the restrictions.  I think I should be able to walk limp free at six weeks as currently I use the canes more for balance.  I generally walk a mile at a time 2x a day.

Leslie
R BHR
10/2/07 Treacy

kriyamon

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Re: Walking
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2007, 07:54:15 PM »
Good topic I needed some advice on.


Now after I've read what you wrote, I am much more educated.  I have a special problem though and wondered if someone could simplify.  I have a bad right wrist and the crutch continues to cause great pain, and I know I'm wearing out what little bone remains there.  I wasn't able to get a forearm platform crutch as I wanted as there seems to be safety questions from  PTs and my insurance would not pay.  This really su#ked, but I can't afford it and no loan pool I'm near has one.

Anyway, here's my question:  I've caught glimpses of people's inputs on the use of ski poles as walking devices as one transitions to unaided walking.  Can anyone summarize?  I use my crutch in this manner sometimes now because it doesn't hurt my wrist.

Pat Walter

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Re: Walking
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2007, 08:24:42 PM »
Hi

Maybe someone that used poles or sticks will talk to you.  I can say however, that after you start to heal, the cane, crutch or even stick is really more for balance than really do much to keep you from being weight bearing.  Your muscles are weak and you are unbalanced.

I think if something seems to work for you - that is good. Holding a pole so you are in a way pulling down with your wrist for support with the pole more in front of you is certainly a different motion that pushing up on a cane or even a crutch with your wrist.

I hope someone else can help more.

Pat
Webmaster/Owner of Surface Hippy
3/15/06 LBHR De Smet

 

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