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Author Topic: questions  (Read 1044 times)

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osubucks

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questions
« on: November 16, 2011, 01:52:57 PM »
I have a question and am also looking for an opinion.How long do you have to wait to take a shower after surgery?Also
my parents live in a condo where everything is on the first floor and my house has my bedroom on the second floor, would
I be better to stay there for awhile to avoid the steps?
Also when are you able to move from a walker to a cane?
thanks

curt

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Re: questions
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2011, 02:08:39 PM »
        You can take a shower as soon as you feel that you can stand and safely do so.  The incision needs to stay as dry as possible, but if they used a waterproof bandage you will have no problem.  That comes off after about a week to 10 days.  If not, then jury-rigging one with waterproof tape and a bit of plastic should do the trick.  They just don't want you to get it really wet or immerse it for 3-4 weeks until the wound closes up and heals.
          As you will see from the different posts on this site, everyone is different in their recovery and abilities.  Most seem to graduate from two crutces in about a week and then use a cane/one crutch/walker after that for varying periods.  I found that I could get around the house and do short stuff unassisted after the second week or so.  When I did my daily walks I used the cane or one crutch up to 3 weeks due to getting tired and trying to avoid limping.  Its all based upon how YOU are doing.  There is no recipe but those were my individual results.
        As for stairs, they show you how to comfortably go up and down stairs with crutches or a cane but its a little slow.  If you think you will be going back and forth to your room alot, then a first floor would be nice.  Otherwise it doesn't hurt and the way they show you how to do it is perfectly safe and a good workout for your non-operative leg at least. 
      Finally, I'll bet that your parents would LOVE to have you there and take care of you.  At 50, my dad drove me back from surgery and would like to have moved into my house to take care of me.  Thats what they do.  I toughed it out instead with my mean ol' wife and kids! 
     Hope some of this helps, like I said the site is full others' recovery stories and it will give you some idea of the spread on how things can progress.  Curt
51 yr, RHBiomet, Dr. Gross, 9/30/11
happy, hopeful, hip-full

osubucks

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Re: questions
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2011, 02:14:18 PM »
Thanks for the info Curt, very helpful!My folks will be in Fla so it will be my wife and daughter taking care of me.

curt

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Re: questions
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2011, 02:28:35 PM »
    Oh, then if they are like mine they won't be as impressed unless you show them the incision.  More of the get it yourself attitude at my house, if you know what it means.  They didn't buy into my Scarlett O'hara routine all that much!  Curt
51 yr, RHBiomet, Dr. Gross, 9/30/11
happy, hopeful, hip-full

cassiewoofer

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Re: questions
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2011, 02:31:43 PM »
Well it will depend on the hospital rules re letting you go home, but I was only allowed to leave when I had walked up stairs with a cane and using the handrail. that was 3 days after the op, however we were snowed in for a further 3 days so I actually got out after 6 and moved around the two floors of our house with just a cane no problems. Never had a walker but it will depend on your fitness level and upper body strength... and weight. And your independence level I personally hate anyone helping me!!
 Hey Curt sounds like a good house philosiphy that, 'GET IT YERSELF!'

 Good luck
 
« Last Edit: November 16, 2011, 02:34:03 PM by cassiewoofer »

DGossack

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Re: questions
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2011, 03:41:49 PM »
The big thing on showering or immersing it is water is to avoid possible infection.  So like the others said, you will need to have waterproof bandages or something similar.  I have heard of people wrapping their legs in plastic wrap even.  Otherwise a sponge bath.   :(

We set up a bed downstairs at my gf's house but never used it.  It was no problem to go up the stairs to bed (notice I didn't say sleep because that was difficult at first).  I found a comfortable place downstairs to spend the day with a table next to it.  There were a few nights where I ended up back down in that spot rather than bed.

My gf wanted to do more for me but I am so stubborn and independent that I ended taking care of most things myself.  It is nice to know they are there just in case though.

Best wishes.

Dan
LBHR, Dr. Pritchett, 8/1/2011
fullmetalhip.wordpress.com

Anniee

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Re: questions
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2011, 09:57:58 PM »
I was able to take a shower the day after my surgery.  My doctor uses a waterproof bandage that stays on for 7 days, then you can take it off and shower without a bandage. I am sure your doctor will give you directions in regards to this, because I'm sure it depends on how your incision is closed and the kind of bandage he uses.

I never used a walker, just crutches and a cane.  I used two crutches for a few days, then one crutch for a few more.  After that, I used a cane for about another week or so for walks outside, and nothing around the house.  The physical therapists taught us how to walk up and down stairs at the hospital the day after the surgery.  (If this sounds  a lot like what Curt told you, it's because we had the same doctor and hospital :)).

I have no stairs at my house but I think it would have felt like a lot of work to go up and down a set of stairs several times a day for the first week or so after surgery.  However, once I got out of bed in the morning, I did not get back in until bed time. I used my recliner and couch for resting and napping.  So I don't think going up and down just once per day would have been a big deal.

Good luck with your surgery!

Annie
Annie/ Right Uncemented Biomet 4-20-11/Left Uncemented Biomet 10-12-11/Dr. Gross

Tin Soldier

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Re: questions
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2011, 03:54:43 AM »
Stairs are pretty easy once you get the hang of it.  Up with the good, down with the bad.

I was similar to Ainnee on both with the transition from crutches to one crutch, to cane.  It was probabaly a bit more like 1 week on 2 crutches and 1 week on 1 crutch, and then about 2 to 3 weeks on a cane.  There seems to be 2 schools of thought on the cane.  Get rid of the cane as soon as you can, or keep the cane until you feel confident you won't need it to keep from tripping or falling.  A walking aid may promote continuation of the limp, however with being thoughtful of your stride, you should be fine if you slowly take weight off the cane, then keeping it for a bit when tired, or maybe in rougher terrain.
LBHR 2/22/11, RBHR 8/23/11 - Pritchett.

 

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