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Author Topic: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni  (Read 1404 times)

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Owl

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Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« on: March 08, 2018, 10:22:05 PM »
I had hip resurfacing with Dr. Gross in SC eight days ago and generally expected the normal recovery program with a chance of the slow down recovery program depending on what was discovered during surgery.


It turned out that my hip was worse than the x-rays indicated and Dr. Gross had to use a special acetabular cup and do some bone grafting on both the acetabulum and femoral head.  He informed me in the recovery room that I'd be on the extra slow down program (which I didn't know existed until that moment) so I'm 10% weight bearing for six weeks, then I have x-rays and PT range-of-motion measurements taken (I live 900 miles from Dr. Gross and am doing remote follow-up at six weeks), send those to the Dr. and then he decides how to proceed after that.  I'm hopping around on a walker and expect to be for another two months at least.


I originally planned to be at work within about three weeks but, given how exhausting just tending to my basic daily needs at home while using only one leg is, I don't see how I'll manage returning until I have some significant weight bearing ability.  I live alone and have no idea how I'd even drive.  I might be able to get in the car but handling the walker alone is an issue.  My workplace isn't very handicap friendly, either.


Have any of y'all been on the extra slow down program while working and, if so, how did you cope?












einreb

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Re: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2018, 10:58:41 PM »
He informed me in the recovery room that I'd be on the extra slow down program (which I didn't know existed until that moment) so I'm 10% weight bearing for six weeks,


I found out  day before surgery that the bone density in my bad hip was really bad.  I had 10 weeks at 10% so you're getting away easy :)


I'll admit, it was a little frustrating?  First few weeks you're in hardcore recovery mode anyway so it doesnt really stand out.


Be mindful.  Enjoy the lack of hip pain as you recover!!! :) Next, consider those 6 weeks to be an investment in the long term success of your hip.


Good luck and those 6 weeks will fly by.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2018, 10:59:23 PM by einreb »
40yo at the time of my 2/16/2011 left hip uncemented Biomet resurface with Tri Spike Acetabular cup by Gross

horse doc

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Re: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2018, 11:21:47 AM »
I had to agree to the ultra slow before scheduling.  I was out of work 3 months, 3 weeks.  I work for myself so it was expensive.  I work outdoors on my feet and did so with a cane for 1 month. 

I think that crutches make more sense than a walker for getting around on one leg, getting into cars etc.   I was very active on my crutches before going back to work.  I protected the operated hip very well but I made my good hip pretty angry by doing so. 

Look at it as a good excuse to take it easy for a while.

claudia

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Re: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2018, 04:25:56 PM »
Owl, I've joined the club... Had my hip surgery on March 21 with Dr Gross and was told that I needed to be on crutches with 10% weight bearing for 4-6 weeks and then a cane for 4 weeks.  I am pretty helpless and if it weren't for my husband I don't know what I would do.  The worst part for me though is the pain.  I was completely unprepared for the amount of pain I am in. It has been 4 days of hell.  We had to switch the pain pills because I was throwing them up and the new ones work pretty well to take the edge off but just sitting, getting up and movement brings on excruciating pain.  To raise and lower my leg is so painful I can barely stand it. The night before my surgery I saw a few guys who had already had the surgery done and walking pain free with crutches.  WHAT!!!  I guess that is what I was expecting.  Just the drive home was hell everytime we went over a road bump.  I don't know how I will get by when my husband goes back to work.  Can't do simple things - I would have loved to experience complete relief after the surgery but guess that it will take longer for me to recover.
Dr Gross, Right hip, 3/21/18

Owl

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Re: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2018, 02:05:22 PM »

Claudia, I certainly understand your frustration with the difficulty of doing simple things.  I live alone and wasn't expecting my lengthy recovery time but with a hired caregiver who comes in three days a week and a little help from friends, it's working out fine.  I've gotten quite a bit better at hopping around on one leg with a walker (and that leg has become stronger) so It's not nearly as exhausting as it was initially.  The body's ability to adapt and cope is a marvelous thing.


I'm 4.5 weeks post op now and that time has passed quicker than I thought it would.  Nonetheless, I'm anxiously anticipating week 6 when I'll know more about how my weight bearing status may increase.


I suspect (and hope) that you're feeling quite a bit better now than you were 6 days ago.  Good luck with your recovery!

claudia

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Re: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2018, 10:21:51 PM »
Owl, 9 days since surgery and still in pain.  Not as intense but mostly at night. The incision area hurts as well.   Of course, since I can't put more than 10% weight on my hip it's hard to tell.  I do feel a raw grind in my hip when I accidentally put pressure on my leg or rotate my leg inward too much which happens when I sleep.  I am still not able to lift my operated side leg completely on my own.  It's that dead log feeling.  Any lateral movement kills me.
I admire the fact that you are able to get around on one leg with a walker!  I have crutches and it's difficult keeping off my leg.  I suspect most times I am more than 10% weight bearing.  So my main problem now is sleeping. SO difficult.  So uncomfortable.  Hopefully this too will pass.  Please keep us updated on your progress!  For those of us who are "bone deficient".

Dr Gross, Right hip, 3/21/18

Owl

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Re: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2018, 07:19:24 PM »
My original comments never garnered many responses so I'm updating my own story for the benefit of future readers. 


I'm now six weeks post-op and had a remote follow-up with Dr. Gross two days ago.  He said my X-rays, etc. looked good and that I could begin progressively adding weight over the next SIX WEEKS and then we'd have another follow-up and decide my path forward after that, probably progressing to a cane for a month.


The first six weeks passed faster than I thought they would.  My good leg became noticeably stronger after a few weeks so hopping around on the walker and standing mostly on one leg wasn't as exhausting as it was initially.


My major complaint with the limited weight-bearing and using a walker is not being able to drive to get out of the house.  I live alone and, although I could physically operate a vehicle, getting in/out and loading/unloading a walker alone is the problem without being allowed to put much weight on the leg.


I'm hoping to transition to crutches within a couple of weeks which would be much more conducive to driving but my initial trials with them so far have been kind of scary as they're not nearly as stable as a walker.  Safety is my primary concern (a fall could be devastating) so if I need to sit on my loins indoors for another six weeks that's what I'll do.  I'm not going to risk injury trying to return to work on crutches if I don't feel safe on them.

I have quite a bit of sick time at work plus short-term disability insurance so, financially, I'm fine with being off for three months or more.  I also have a hired caregiver who comes in three days a week for two hours a day to help keep up the house and other things including helping me bathe.  I don't have any showers or tubs in my home that I can get in with such limited weight bearing so I've been taking sponge baths for the past six weeks.  That first shower six or eight weeks from now is going to feel mighty good!



This recovery has been very much longer than I thought it would be initially but I'm getting through it.  I'm following Doctor's orders to the letter for the best outcome possible.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 07:22:07 PM by Owl »

catfriend

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Re: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2018, 09:27:47 PM »
OMG no decent shower or hair washing??!! I would die. I couldn't get into my tub shower for quite some time, either. I know they showed me how at the hospital, but I couldn't remember how and could never figure it out. After a little over a week of sponge bathing I had my neighbor take me to my local community center/gym as it has a handicapped cabana designed for rolling into with a chair, etc, so no lip to step over. It's also large and has grab bars, and everything for the handicapped. I don't know if you belong to a gym that has such an accommodation, but if you do have someone drive you there and back. If not, maybe call around and see if you can find a place, even if it means paying a day fee. It will be worth to have that first shower. I hope your healing progresses faster than expected.

claudia

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Re: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2018, 09:41:23 PM »
Hi Owl,
Dr Gross started me on crutches with 10% weight bearing..It's been 3 weeks today.  I'm not sure how they compare to a walker but like anything, you'll get the hang of it.  You do have to be careful with regard to balance but it looks like you will be able to put some more weight on the operated side so you shouldn't have any problems.   I still need assistance with showering because I have to bring the crutches in with me to our walk-in shower (the master bath is tub shower combo and it's too difficult to lift my leg and the rounded sides of the tub are not conducive to standing with crutches.) For me, still difficult getting in and out of the car as a passenger and I fear the crutches will fall (not me) if I'm trying to enter the car on my own to drive.   I would highly recommend you purchase crutch pads for the crutches as your weight will be on your hands as you move forward.  My palms hurt soo bad before I got the pads.  They ran about 11.00 from Walmart or you can get them from Amazon.  Going up and down stairs can be tricky and takes some practice.  Just a step down from the house to our patio makes me nervous.   One thing for sure- you will build up your shoulders and arms while being on crutches.   Sounds like it's going well for you and I look forward to updates as you progress to crutches.  :)     





Dr Gross, Right hip, 3/21/18

Pat Walter

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Re: Extra Slow Recovery Program Alumni
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2018, 06:21:46 PM »
Hi Owl

Thanks for sharing your update.  Always nice to hear how patients are doing and very beneficial for perspective patients thinking about hip resurfacing.

Dr. Gross is very conservative with his hip resurfacing patients.  Better to be slow and patient, than facing a revision.

Good Luck.  Looking forward to your updates in the future.

Pat
Webmaster/Owner of Surface Hippy
3/15/06 LBHR De Smet

 

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