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Author Topic: Post Surgical Support  (Read 1462 times)

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jimbone

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Post Surgical Support
« on: June 08, 2018, 04:35:20 PM »
Hello All-


Looking for opinions and insights regarding how much and what kind of assistance you needed when returning to home after hip resurfacing surgery.  I'm single, live alone and most of the friends I'd be prone to ask for any kind of help live far enough away as to make it a considerable burden for them to be much help.  I've spoken with a local CNA who I can probably afford to come in briefly once a day a few days a week and a couple of local friends I feel comfortable asking for mostly minimal assistance- maybe a grocery run or the like.  Picked up a good powered recliner for snoozes and sleeping on the back [not that bad], always a pair of crutches in the closet, there's a walk in shower in my bedroom with a built in bench that should be high enough, found some of those grabber sticks, looking for a sock aide, will find a raised toilet seat and stock the cupboard and fridge with simple quick to fix meals.  Only 3 steps in and out of the house, otherwise a single floor homestead. How much help do you think needs to be available?  Thanks in advance.

catfriend

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2018, 03:25:34 AM »
I've sent you a pm. I had my hip resurfaced by Dr. P, and I am a single person. You can recover on your own. I arranged my house and food so that it would not be a problem. The first day was tough. I dropped both my reachers, and had difficulties. I had a catsitter who came in, picked them up for me, and made me a sandwich. You can search on Amazon for a hip/knee kit which will have the basics you are referring to. You also might consider an ass wiper from Amazon. I didn't have one for my first surgery, but will buy one for my next one. Frozen food is helpful, even if it's not something you would normally eat. Check who delivers groceries to your house. Somebody does, even if you don't know it now. For me it was Safeway.

I didn't have 24 hour a day help. I did have a cat sitter to come in and scoop the litter tray and change out the cat food plate. That's all she did. I had no other in home help. My next door neighbor, and my neighbors across the street, each had keys to my house and could be over at a moment's notice in case of emergency. One time I couldn't get up and had to call my neighbor. I think that was the only time I ever had to call for emergency assistance. The more days that pass, the less help you will need.

The worst thing for me was how my house turned into a pig sty. I knew that because of the 90 degree  restrictions I wouldn't be able to do things like vacuum or change my bedding. Living through that was another thing. Eventually a neighbor vacuumed my house and changed my bedding. If you can afford for someone to clean your house during this time, do it. That's something I will do with my next hip.

Feel free to pm me with any specifics.

jimbone

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2018, 04:23:22 PM »
Hi Catfriend-


I sent a PM.  Let me know if you got it- I'm new to how the site works.  I've read many stories of folks doing the recovery on their own and most likely they are generally very self sufficient people accustomed to looking after themselves and their affairs, as am I.  A concern is that in at least one of the online video/interviews with the surgeon he expresses a strong preference, almost an insistence, that surgical patients have a suitable support network for the initial phase of their recovery.  I expect to receive the surgical preparation package from the doctors office this week and will see what recommendations/ requirements are listed on this subject.  Thanks for responding.


Best,


Jim

Saddlepal3

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2018, 01:38:11 PM »
Even if you plan to recover on your own, be sure to have a Plan B. Recoveries from major surgery are not entirely predictable. At the minimum, have someone to check in with (in person or by phone) a couple of times a day. Good luck!

jimbone

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2018, 06:53:44 PM »
Hi Saddlepal-


I've put some emergency safeguards in place should I run into one.  Currently waiting on MRSR nasal swab results [in on Mon.] that could delay my surgery date, something I would really wish to avoid.  Keeping my fingers crossed.  Thanks for the response.


Jim

karlos.bell

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2018, 04:34:34 AM »

I had bilateral resurfacing and travelled back to New Zealand by myself.


Make sure ice is easy to get - some small food snacks of great quality - non slip floor in shower - chair in shower if you can - bowl for hot water of need be - slip on shoes - plenty to read or play for entertainment.


It is do able… Cheers K
2019-2020 THR Left & Right COC Revision Zim Continuum cup with Biolox Delta Cer Liner, Biolox Delta Cer Head 40mm 12/14 Taper, CPT Stem Cem.
2019-2020 removal of Hip Resurfacing due to Metal Toxicity Cobalt - Chromium.
2015 MOM Conserve plus
2011-2013 FAI hip surgery failure
2007-Injury wakeboarding

Owl

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2018, 10:47:11 AM »
I'm single, live alone, and have much the same friend relationships as you.  I had resurfacing on 02-28-2018 and had planned for a normal recovery alone but awakened after surgery to the news that I'd be on the extra-slow recovery program due to some severe acetabular erosion and the need for bone grafts.  I was on a walker with 10% weight-bearing for six weeks, transitioning to crutches and ramping up to 100% weight-bearing over another six weeks, then going to one crutch, then a cane which I got off of about 17 weeks post-op. 


My brother, who lives out of state, accompanied me for surgery (I live 900 miles away from Dr. Gross) then stayed with me for a few days after I got home.  I couldn't see myself being alone for weeks after that with the weight bearing limitations so I quickly arranged for a caregiver to come in three days a week which afforded a lot of peace-of-mind, kept up with the housework, etc.  A friend from work also checked on me daily, by phone or in person.  The first two weeks after surgery were the most scary as it was difficult just getting up and down from chairs and the toilet using one leg and any kind of fall could have been devastating.  My good leg quickly became stronger and things were better after that.


If you have a normal recovery with weight-bearing as tolerated right after surgery, convalescing alone would be easier than with a lengthy recovery like mine.  Nonetheless, you might consider some hired help for a few weeks after surgery as it's definitely comforting and helpful.


Good luck.






« Last Edit: July 07, 2018, 10:49:16 AM by Owl »

jimbone

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2018, 09:20:25 PM »
Thanks All for the good feedback and insight.  Have a call in to the CNA to set up some in house visits- thinking meal preparation, maybe a backyard shampooing in the summer sun to try and feel normal and clean.  Some of the videos I've watched show people walking normally and doing stairs normally 1 week after resurfacing.  My expectations are far more modest but am looking forward to being able to walk long distances again and enjoy it.  Have a pre-hab PT meeting scheduled for tomorrow- will be receiving instructions for in/out bed, car, chair, shower, doing stairs ect.  Surgeon likes his patients well prepared for recovery.  As stated- biggest concern is the MRSR results which I will learn after PT in the morning.  If it's good it will start 1 week countdown.  I look forward to being made whole once again.  Thanks again to all for the support and insight.

Saddlepal3

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2018, 12:39:56 PM »
Hi Jimbone,
How are you doing?

jimbone

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2018, 05:14:25 PM »
Hi Saddlepal-


I would have to say that at least subjectively I'm doing well.  The surgery began with anesthesia at 10AM and I was discharged at 6PM that evening after having been put through my paces with PT and OT who had me do a short lap around the floor which was all they wanted to see because at the time I felt able to do several city blocks.  Relied on the Oxycodone the first day while icing in the recliner between several home PT solo sessions but I found the effects too heavy and euphoric so dropped them and reverted to Tramadol thereafter as needed.  My routine so far has been PT 3 times a day and progressing from laps inside many times a day to my first solo outside venture on day 6 for about 200 yards.  By the next day 3 separate 400 yard walks with solo home PT sessions have become the routine, adjusted slightly up or down if it feels like too much.  Surprising how many very small, nuanced changes are noticed when self monitoring the body this closely- this morning I am feeling a very slight and gradual loosening/stretching out of the front hip flexors and their positive response to bed stretches- a very welcome development.  There are a couple of the PT exercises I was given at the hospital that are more of a struggle and relate directly to my pre-surgical soft tissue restrictions/weakness- so I give them extra attention to see them come back to good function correctly.  All of my walking  since day 6 has been on one crutch which I still need for balance and some minimal weight bearing- I will find a cane in the next day or so and begin getting used to that as the crutch just held by hand is awkward for use as a cane support.  Two nights ago I was cleaning some coffee grounds at the sink and realized I had turned and walked across the 10' kitchen without my crutch.  Pondered that for a minute and went back to get it.  I'll do a little shuffling around now without any aids, but the gait and pace are an ugly, hobbled and pathetic thing to look at so I'll continue to rely on a walking aid until my strength and natural balance is re-established.  The never extensive swelling is responding to ice, elevation and treatment and is beginning to subside.  Overcoming morning inertia and a nights immobility is a challenge but getting easier with each passing day.  I have my 2 week check up 7/30, so looking forward to Dr. Pritchett's  evaluation of imaging, movement, wound healing ect. and planning on making the next month until the 6 week check as healing as I can manage.  A goal of 1 unaided mile of walking at that point in recovery is a standard used by another widely respected resurfacing surgeon who has graphed/reference those metrics, and after Dr. Pritchett's approval will become my objective.


When OT asked me at the hospital what my goal was I spontaneously uttered "Climb Mt. Rainier next year".  Although never a serious consideration for me before, I am now giving it some thought as an appropriate height to aspire to if it can be done. 

Saddlepal3

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2018, 06:49:33 PM »
Great to hear you are doing so well! Did Dr. Pritchett allow you to skip a walker and go straight to crutches after surgery? As you get stronger, consider trekking poles rather than a cane for PT walks. They provide support but help to keep your body upright.

jimbone

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2018, 07:33:31 PM »
Saddlepal-I asked if he had a preference for a walker or crutches during my last consult.  He deferred to PT on the subject.  Since I am practically an adept on crutches from more than one foot/ankle/leg/knee injury I felt most confident with those and had spent a good bit of effort the last months on upper body strengthening to carry me all the way through.  Your mention of poles sounds intuitively correct.  It feel like more a balance need than a weight bearing support need, but I'll try out a friends to see.  Might be a cane first for awhile then poles.  From all that I gather a strong, natural, balanced gait and pace needs to be established and well rooted during the recovery interim before abandoning aids and leaving oneself open to poor posture/walking form that will inevitably lead to muscular/skeleton problems down the road.  The sports I practiced when young helped develop good proprioception, that's my go to resource for physicality but I plan to get some objective feedback with PT at some early point.

catfriend

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2018, 05:56:02 AM »
Glad to hear you are doing so well! I have been wondering about you, but didn't want to bother you too soon after surgery.

jimbone

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Re: Post Surgical Support
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2018, 04:50:30 PM »
Hello Catfriend-


I suspected you were holding off to give my recovery some time.  Very fortunately, although I have a fair share of aches, pains, stiffness and some swelling [morning mobilization would be easier with an air cushioned forklift, 3 flaggers and a traffic cop to provide directions] the recovery has gone well so far.  The irrational side of my brain warns me I am jeopardizing the healing by even mentioning its progress and I hope I don't come across as Pollyannish or smug.  Fact is my overwhelming emotional reaction has been one of gratitude beyond my normal range of experience.  I had a text this morning from the anesthesiologist  requesting feed back on her services- I was so happy to get it- from day 2 I had contacted the service and the hospital to locate the names and email addresses of everyone in the operating theater along with PT and OT to send them a note of my deepest appreciation.  Honestly, for the few minutes in the OR before sedation took effect I don't recall, as an adult, a sense of such complete concern for my well being as I experienced in those peoples care and I look forward to letting them know how much that helped me.  Hoping all is well with you, thanks for checking in.

 

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