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Author Topic: Running speed  (Read 326 times)

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Minniemuis

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Running speed
« on: February 21, 2021, 10:45:06 AM »
Hello,

A running specific question: do you feel limited in the running you can do after resurfacing, mileagewise or speedwise?
Can you still run fast?

Any competitive runners here?

How come I still hear some doctors recommend to limit running with a resurfaced hip?

petemeads

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2021, 11:48:43 AM »
Depends on what you mean by fast - at 70 my current fast is pretty slow but I ran a mile in 7:03 and 16.5 miles in 2:37:27 last week, and 5k in 25:57 today. In Masters Age Grade percentage terms I am running as fast as I ever did so the hips are not restricting me, just Old Father Time.

MoM bearings can wear and the metal ions are potentially allergenic/poisonous, this is probably why surgeons want people to limit their activity. Blood tests will show chrome/cobalt levels and this can indicate wear. I get another 3-year test in 9 months, if that shows an increase I might have to back off a bit - but I have a 48 mile mountain challenge to do before then, Covid lockdowns willing...
Age 70, LBHR 48mm head 18th Nov 2014 and RTHR 36mm head Zimmer ceramic/ceramic 2nd May 2017 by Mr Christopher Kershaw, Spire hospital, Leicester UK.

BionicHip

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2021, 03:03:13 PM »
Hey Minniemuis,

I am also wondering how the running will be once I am healed.  After reading Jim Thyne's running progress after hip resurfacing it provides hope.  Not sure if the following link will work; otherwise, you will have to search for it:

https://surfacehippy.info/jim-thyne-s-hip-resurfacing-with-professor-meek-2019/

Petemeads running experience also provides hope.  At 70 running a mile just over 7 minutes is a good time ... I would bet most people at 70 would have a hard time running that time with their own hips.

Like you I am hopeful and it's nice to know other people are able to run well after hip resurfacing
Right Hip Resurfaced at age 62
Adept MoM: Head=54mm / Cup=60mm
Dr. Koen De Smet

Minniemuis

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2021, 10:28:44 AM »
@petemeads By fast I think pretty fast by most standards, in september 2019 my husband ran his last race - 15K at 5:28 mile pace at age 50. He won the race overall and he was not even in his best shape. A few months later the pain in the groin appeared. That is why is is so hard to accept, from never even a hint of trouble in the hip to debilitating OA in just a few months...

blinky

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2021, 01:33:12 PM »
I was not told to limit my activity. I was told that not everyone can return to running. The return is not guaranteed 100%. If you read here, you will see many, maybe even most, do, but some cannot. The odds are overwhelmingly in your H's favor.

I am with the earlier poster. My hips feel great, but the rest of me is getting older so I face new challenges.

petemeads

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2021, 03:32:26 PM »
@Minniemuis - that is fast!

Try googling Michael Rix for that sort of speed - in the 6 years after his ceramic THR he did 248 5k parkruns at an average of 17:30 and has won sprint triathlons. He's about 48 and frequently posts on Hiprunner. He is not doing long distances any more to avoid wear and tear.

My best mile was 5:19 and I never broke the hour for ten miles, but could keep going for 60-odd...
Age 70, LBHR 48mm head 18th Nov 2014 and RTHR 36mm head Zimmer ceramic/ceramic 2nd May 2017 by Mr Christopher Kershaw, Spire hospital, Leicester UK.

Minniemuis

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2021, 12:18:08 PM »
Pete, I did check out Michael Rix. That is impressive, but for running my husband was told that resurfacing was definitely the way to go.
It worries me that so many surgeons still advise against running with a resurfaced hip.  Then again, there are encouraging stories on this forum as well.

petemeads

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2021, 06:31:58 PM »
I  originally went for the resurfacing because it is mechanically superior and McMinn's website had lots of stories from active people getting back to their lives. Weak bone meant that the second hip attempt failed so I got the ceramic as second-best. In actuality they basically feel the same,  but it is not the choice I would have made with the information I had at the time of my first op. Both will see me out!

If a resurfacing goes wrong then a ceramic THR is a great fallback. THR surgeons generally don't recommend running, mine said I would not be able to break mine...

Last week ran 30km in 2:59:30 and this afternoon managed 23:32 for 5km - fastest 5k since Oct 2016, when I only had one fake (resurfaced) hip - really pleased!
Age 70, LBHR 48mm head 18th Nov 2014 and RTHR 36mm head Zimmer ceramic/ceramic 2nd May 2017 by Mr Christopher Kershaw, Spire hospital, Leicester UK.

Minniemuis

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2021, 09:35:11 AM »
I am happy to hear thatyou are satisfied with both.

What makes me uneasy is that even on his website, Dr De Smet mentions that running seems to be the hardest sport to come back to after resurfacing.
I wonder why this is.

imgetinold

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2021, 05:07:12 PM »
I'm not, and never have been, a competitive runner.  However, I did enjoy the 3-4 mile run about 3-4x per week because it's just the easiest way to burn maximum calories in minimum time.  In my late twenties and early thirties, I could string together about 3-4 sub 6:30 miles, which was great for me.


The day before my first resurfacing (2012, 9 years ago) I actually ran 4 miles the day before my surgery.  After my surgery and the 6-month waiting period that Dr. Gross recommends before any impact activity, I started to try to run.  As many suggested, I started with 30 seconds running, 1 minute rest, and then progressively working towards more running less walking.  When I finally started running with no walking, I would get a deep groin ache around the 3/4 mile mark and have to stop.  If I powered through, I would be hobbling for a few days.  I tried PT but nothing really changed it.  So I basically didn't run anymore.


Fast forward almost 8 years I joined a boot-camp style gym.  TONS of lower body moves.  Super hard, and WAY more lower body work than I had ever done.  One of the groups I worked out with started running after class, and I joined them.  I ran a mile with no issues.  Outside of class, I found I was able to run over 2 miles with no issues.  So, I think that the surgery and requisite recovery time weakened some smaller muscles that led to the pain, and that a comprehensive strengthening of all things leg/glute was the key. 

Now I'm on month #4 for the second hip, so I will put this theory back to the test in 2 more months.  Good luck!
Andy
- Right Biomet uncemented HR with Dr. Gross on 1/11/2012
- Left Biomet uncemented HR with Dr. Gross on 10/28/2020

BOILER UP!

Minniemuis

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2021, 09:29:21 AM »
@imgetinold  I wonder how your experiment will turn out, because that would mean that you have it in your own hands, or at least partly. As I understand so far, it seems to be a lottery, some can run, and some can't, and some can run but are restricted in speed or mileage. If would really be a whole other story if muscle weakness is the cause of those problems.  That being said, we saw Dr De Smet a few days ago and his theory is that some people get some local inflammation or that it may be caused by the fluid in the metal joint that warms up. This is not so good news, because this is something you can do nothing about. For this, the CoC may be a solution...

For now, Dr De Smet and his colleagues confirm the OA diagnosis for my husband, but at this moment they would prefer not to do surgery because surprisingly, he can still do too much, which would result in the surgery not being enough of an improvement for him. They literally said, the longer you can wait, the better for us. I found this a bit strange and contradictory. So far for the statement that there is a window of opportunity for resurfacing.
We have bought the FAI fix programme, hoping that the tissue work and stretches may help even a little. 

imgetinold

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Re: Running speed
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2021, 08:02:48 PM »
I will definitely be back here with my getting-back-to-running results.  However, for the four months prior to surgery, and of course since, I have done little to no lower body stuff.  About 2 months ago, I started to do some unweighted walking lunges, and today I did leg extensions and leg curls (light weight).  Since I'm no longer going to the boot-camp gym, I'm going to have to force myself to do all those kinds of exercises (which I hate because they're so hard).  But I'm going to just to see if I can run again.


In the end, if I can't run.......I don't care.  I can do everything else, and do it with no pain.


Andy
Andy
- Right Biomet uncemented HR with Dr. Gross on 1/11/2012
- Left Biomet uncemented HR with Dr. Gross on 10/28/2020

BOILER UP!

 

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