+-

Advertisements

Welcome Back

The Hip Talk Discussion Forum was hacked a few weeks back. It has taken me a long time to fix it. The only backup I could use was way back to April 2020. All members and posts up to that date are available. Anything newer has been lost. I am sorry, but that has been the only way to get things up and running again.

Author Topic: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens  (Read 20598 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« on: January 12, 2009, 11:16:49 PM »
Monday 1/12/2009 +5 days
I thought it would be a good opportunity to track my progress and experience as I will be undergoing the second half of my bilateral BHR later this spring.

Brief history:  Male 39. 185lbs.  Over the past 5 years hip pain had progressed to the point where I couldn't run, bend, sit for any length of time...etc. Finally got xrays when I realized that the pain wasn't normal aging.  Xray revealed severe osteoarthritis in both hips, a flat spot on each ball that likely contributed to the early deterioration and such.  I played basketball in college, and was very active at one time, and as the pain progressed over the years, I slowly became less active. It was subtle enough early on that I never considered that it was anything except age catching up with me.  The trigger that got me to finally go to the doctor was on a vacation to the Black Hills and a family trail ride.  Ever get on a horse with hip pain?  Well, not to disappoint the kids, I somehow hoisted myself up using my upper body to get me onto the saddle.  I had tears in my eyes by the end of the bumpy ride. 

I progressed through the initial treatments of cortisol injections into each hip.  There was no noticeable relief after 1 week.  Next step, meet with the local Orthopedic Surgeon.  The Dr. I met is very highly regarded locally, and I believe he is very good at what he does.  Unfortunately, he recommended a THR for me at 38 years old.  Now I had done very little research, and already had heard positive things about resurfacing.  When I asked him to clarify "why not" the resurfacing, he said that there were no real long term benefits to it.  It really chapped me that a highly regarded surgeon would not have better understanding of options for someone my age.  I wonder how many THR have been done on people who would have benefited from the resurfacing.  the number must be staggering.  So as an layperson with a computer, I researched more and more--a lot on this site.  Obviously I went to get a second opinion and tracked down a surgeon in Stillwater MN, Dr. David Palmer.  Now I found a surgeon who was regarded by many to be the best in the state of MN (including Mayo Clinic).  Dr. Palmer performs both THR and resurfacing, and clearly understands the benefits of each.  I got my answer from him.  "You are a perfect candidate for resurfacing".  This reaffirmed what I knew in my gut. 

So we looked at my insurance and the timing, and found that January 2009 would be best for the first, and we'd follow up with the second as recommended based on recovery of the first (late spring).

Here we are 5 days after my left hip resurfacing. 
Surgery was in the afternoon on Wed. 1/7.  I remember being asked to lean forward for my spinal, and next thing I knew I was up in recovery.  I was Dr. Palmer's 4th of 6 resurfacings for the day.  I was nauseated the first night whenever I tried to sit up, but I was hungry and felt alright other than that.  Lay down for a few minutes, and I was fine again.  No need to get out of bed until Thursday.  I never felt much "pain" after the surgery when lying still.  Of course there is swelling, and I was pretty surprised at how weak my leg was.  I could move my toes, but there was no way I could lift the leg on my own.  I had an IV with anitbiotics and fluids, and I did get a coffee, broth, sherbert dinner-it was pretty good considering, and the nurses said as long as I felt ok they could bring me toast and juice which I had during the evening and in the middle of the night. Pain meds were given orally, and initially I was given 1 Ocxycodone which they increased to 2 as the throbbing leg was keeping me up.  After that, no real pain issues.
Got some real food the next day and in the afternoon did a lap around the nurses station with a walker.  Pretty wobbly, but not so bad.  My unoperated leg is strong, and I felt pretty comfortable moving again.  It was more of a mental struggle to walk properly again.
I did some PT on Thursday and Friday, and met with the occupational therapist on Friday prior to discharge.  I learned the most helpful thing from her to use my cane to help support and lift my operated leg.  With the cane upside down under the foot and the shaft supporting the inside of the leg, it helps to keep the knee out, move the leg safely and reduces the chance of tweaking it. 
I was discharged on Friday and had to crawl right into bed after the 2.5 hour ride home.  Felt pretty sick being upright for so long in the car.  After lying down again I felt good.  Over the next two days, I had what I believe was a spinal induced headache that was my only real complaint.  That cleared up by Sunday. 
Leg strength and movement with my PT exercises has improved by leaps each day.  I felt so much better on Saturday, then on Sunday, then today.  I am pretty vigilant with icing.  I've wrap my leg with the ice packs I've got and the leg stays chilled and elevated as much as possible.  I've been icing when I go to bed, and when I wake for my pain meds.  In the morning I go through my exercises and move for a while, then ice like crazy again.  The swelling moves from my operated thigh across my butt to the un -operated leg.  It has subsided a lot since Saturday, but I expect it will come and go for weeks to come yet. 

At night, I have woke in a total sweat and chilled on occasion.  I think I will stop the vistirol at night to see if that may help.  Maybe I'll stop the icing at night too.  A few strange dreams at night don't help either, so we'll have to see if we can get that to change.  More to  come.
todd
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

sroberts

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
  • rbhr Dr Rogerson 6/26/08
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2009, 01:52:40 AM »
hey todd,

Congratulations on your new hip! I lived in Stillwater when I was in college at UW- River Falls a long long time ago. All of your symptoms are typical. I had a lot of initial swelling that dissipated by day 9. You'll have good days and days after you overdo it. Don't worry we all go through it. Relax and rest as much as you can it takes your body a while to heal after major surgery.

take care,

spencer
rbhr 6/26/08

bernsber

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 25
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2009, 03:51:58 PM »
Congrats on your new hip! What part of MN do you live in? I'm in Eden Prairie, and have both my hips resurfaced. I had dysplasia, so my cartilage wore out early. I'm only thirty two now, but have know for tewnty years that I had bad hips. I'm headed to New York today for my six week checkup on my right side(I'm for months postop left side).

Maybe we can start our own Hippy Reunion, MN!

Happy Recovery!
Ben
Dr. Su LBHR 9-11-08
RBHR 12-5-08

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2009, 04:20:07 PM »
Ben,

I'm in Esko which is on I-35 between Cloquet and Duluth.  So 32 years old and 6 weeks into the new hips--how do you feel?  Did you do both at the same time? And had you considered Dr. Palmer in Stillwater?

Good luck!
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2009, 05:23:16 PM »
Tuesday 1/13/09  +6 days

This morning I scheduled my 2 week check with my primary care physician and also scheduled my 6 week follow up with Dr. Palmer. 

I didn't have a very restful sleep again last night.  Woke up often either chilled or sweating several times.  What is interesting is that it wasn't a condition that was long lasting.  I would feel a wave of chill go through my body, then be fine.  I'd wake up an hour later soaked, but not feeling hot.  To get up and go to the bathroom my body was quivering badly as one might experience when sick.  OK, lots of symptoms, restless sleep, etc.  I spoke to one of Dr. Palmer's nurses to see if we could switch up medication or to determine if there might be other issues.  She asked about pain near my incision--none, no additional swelling, and I didn't have a fever.  Apparently the sweating isn't too uncommon, and can be a personal reaction with the Oxycodone.  The vistirol that I stopped taking would actually help some of my night symptoms, she said.  I asked about taking tylenol as an option.  We decided to try Vicodin perscription to see if getting off the Oxcycodone might help things out.  The tylenol may be fine, but she wanted to be sure I had something available that was strong enough if the tylenol wasn't.  I'm not in a race to get off meds, and it's early enough in my recovery, so I will try the vicodin for now and see what happens.  It should give me some data for the next hip at the very least. 
My wife and I have a big trip to Walmart planned this afternoon to get the meds.  I am excited to walk for some distance rather than back and forth in the house.  Too much snow and below 0 all week here to attempt an outdoor adventure yet.  Maybe by the weekend...

I did my beginner's PT exercises again this morning, followed by ice.  The leg strength is coming back.  I'm anxious to get the flexibility to come around now.  Standing, I can raise a bent knee so my foot is 13" off the ground.  Prior to surgery, a 9" stair tread would cause pain, so we've made some progress I think.  My groin is a bit sore from yesterday's exercises, so I don't think I will try to push so much today, but get through the routine with as many reps as is comfortable.  We'll push again in a day or 2. 
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

Tarhoo2

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 108
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2009, 03:42:46 AM »
Todd,

So much of your experience thusfar resonates with me.  While I didn't play b'ball at the college level. I did play at HS level and played IM's at UVA and UNC.  Did and still do love the sport.  Also relate to the pain you went through before surgery and inability to run and exercise for several years.  While I still have a couple of months to go before I can think about running again, I'm doing the recumbent bike 40-50 minutes a day and/or walking 45+ minutes per day.  I can golf again, as the weather here in Virginia allows, and hope to get my game back this spring.

In a previous post you asked about bi-lat hippies.  Well, I had my first 12/18/07 and my second 4/4/08.  I had alot of swelling both times (and with the first, bruising from my lower back to my toes) and learned the importance of icing and elevation.  BTW, I'm 48 and in good health.  Timing on my second BHR was accelerated because the condition of the non-operative hip really deteriorated rapidly during the rehab of the operative hip.  My OS generally likes to allow 6 months for recovery on the first hip before he does the second, but we didn't have that luxury and my physical therapist discussed my situation with him and they agreed that we needed to go ahead with the second hip.  So, I've been where you are and want to encourage you and reassure you that things will be good.

There will be times when you will feel like things are not moving forward as quickly as you would like, but be patient.  My own mantra has been "I walk because I can," given how bad things had gotten before I had my BHR's.

I look forward to hearing about your progress and will be here, along with many others, to cheer you on.

Jim

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2009, 05:13:07 PM »
Jim,
 I appreciate your perspectives as I go through what you've experienced.  I hope that as I tell my story that others who are considering the surgery, or those who have been through it find some common themes.  It sure helps to know there are others out there who understand...I'm getting ready for a quick jaunt to WalMart--I hate shopping and WalMart, but I can hardly wait to walk around a little.

I'll let you know how it goes.
todd
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

jharpjr

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2009, 09:18:46 PM »
Hey Todd,

Happy 1 week anniversary!
My "1 week old hip" is doing well. I feel like a totally different person then I did a week ago, Amazing!
Established a routine of PT, ice, walking, and rest. still have some swelling and bruising is starting to
appear. Have my first post-op appt. with dr clarke on Tuesday 1/20. Looking forward to getting the staples
removed, (hopefully?). Do you have stitches or staples?  Keep up the good work on the road to recovery.
Let me know how your doing.


jharpjr (John)

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2009, 09:59:25 PM »
John,

Thanks and Happy 1 week anniversery to you as well.  I've got dissolvable stitches and steri-strips over the incision.  I think what has been most beneficial is the amount of icing I've been doing. 

I know from having endured some horrible basketball ankle sprains over the years, that ice-elevation-compression cycle is the biggest time saver during recovery. I am happily surprised thus far that I haven't "tweaked" my hip yet. Getting in and out of bed is where I am most fearful/cautious.  All it will take is a heel to drag across the bed or a twist of the body to set me back.

I still have quite a bit of swelling that is pushed around my thigh and rear.  Seems to get a little better each day.  My trip to Walmart was uneventful!  That is a good thing.  I was able to stretch out my gait and practice moving normally.  What a difference a week makes.  By the end I was in a pretty good sweat and in need of my nap, but it felt good to stretch out.  I certainly have quite a way to go yet, but so far so good. 

Last night was my first on the new pain meds.. I stopped the Oxycodone and got a script for Vicodin, which may prove to be more agreeable with me.  I guess I slept a little better, but still woke in a sweat.  Seems the vicodin isn't quite as effective a pain med because I certainly felt more dull pain than I had while on the oxycodone.  We'll give it a few days to see how it goes. 

These last few days I've been low on stamina which is probably similar to most of us.  If I'm upright and moving or doing anything, I can only go around 3 hours before I feel the need to lay and nap or rest.  I had my afternoon nap today post walmart, so now I'm good to go for a couple hours.  Maybe I'll take in my 5th grade daughter's basketball practice tonight.
todd
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2009, 05:26:53 PM »
Thursday 1/15/09 +8 days

Last night's sleep was the best so far. So far I've been sleeping on my back with a pillow or two under the knee of my new hip, and then over my good leg.  This has taken the pressure off the hip and kept my knees apart and has given the leg a secure feeling.  Last night with a pillow between my knees, I laid for a while on my operated hip.  It still feels like a golf ball is in there, but wasn't horribly uncomfortable.  That will be something to revisit in the coming days.  I slept on my good hip most of the night with knees bent and a pillow between.  I've been able to move my hip more freely in the last 24 hours, and can adjust position without too much pain which makes side sleeping possible.  I've regained enough strength to lift and maneuver my leg even with a blanket over it.  There was one moment where I moved to adjust and a muscle within the hip began to contract and knot up.  Fortunately I was able to roll onto my back and take the pressure off that muscle.  I'm assuming the day's workouts were just a bit too much. 

I did a couple flights of stairs up and down going foot over foot yesterday.  The strength and stability has felt really good, and with a cane and hand on a railing, I was able to move pretty well.  I wouldn't attempt this without the support of the cane or railing yet, but it was certainly a good milestone. 
After morning exercises today, I've been icing again.  I've got more muscle soreness in my groin the past couple of days, and the swelling continues to go down. 

More to come.
todd
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

JohnS

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 42
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2009, 06:39:48 PM »
Todd,
It's great to hear that you are doing so well.  You seem to be advancing quit well.  I had my RBHR by Dr. Palmer 11/19/08 and I am very satisifed with the entire experience.  The pain I had in that darn hip was really cramping my style (such as it is).
Keep up the recovery (and don't slack on the PT).
JohnS
John S RBHR 11/19/2008 Dr.Palmer, Minnesota

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2009, 08:37:55 PM »
Good to hear from another of Dr. Palmer's sucess stories! How did you hear about him--are you local?  You are almost 2 months out with the new hip,  How long did it take to feel "normal"?  Similar pain experiences early on?  When people have asked how my pain has been, I keep wondering if I should be feeling worse than I do.  I have to think that Dr. Palmer takes some extra care with the handling of the muscles and doing some detail work inside to help reduce the post op problems.  When did you begin PT?


Thanks!
todd
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2009, 02:13:55 AM »
1/16/09 +9 days

Another pretty uneventful day.  Did some striding out at the mall for a couple hours. It feels good to get everything all warmed up and moving, but by the end, I could feel the leg had enough.  I iced pretty thoroughly after my pt exercises and the walk.  Swelling is down overall again, and still feeling muscle soreness in the groin down to the knee where bruising is showing now. Everything felt just a bit better than the day before.  Slow steady progress...I'm able to bend over to my un-operated foot to do a shoe and sock, but am still a way off from the new side.  I was able to make it through the night without a 4am pain pill, so on the pain front that's an improvement.  I'll give X strength tylenol a chance tonight so I can get back to driving again-soon. 
todd
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

Tarhoo2

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 108
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2009, 03:07:26 PM »
Todd,

It's good to read your posts.  I hope others who are contemplating hip resurfacing or have are scheduled are following along.

Sounds like things are coming along pretty well.  That's great!  Taking stairs foot-over-foot after eight days, especially with just the rail and a cane, is good progress.  Swelling sounds familiar: I was swollen and bruised from lower back to my toes for 2-3 weeks.  In the case of my left leg, it swelled to about 125% of it's normal circumference at calf level.  That was after the first surgery and I believe much of that was due to my failure to elevate the leg regularly enough.  I learned from that and the second go-round was much better.

Hang in there and be patient; progress may seem slow at times.

Jim

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2009, 10:43:26 PM »
Jim,

Thanks for the well wishes.  I don't expect any of my entries here to be too exciting, but I imagine that someone out there will be or has already experienced some of the same things during their recoveries.  For those contemplating resurfacing surgery, I hope that you'll get a sense of what to expect..what's normal...etc.

I was up and around the school most of the day with elementary basketball practices, and took in a HS game as well.  I'm curious to see how the swelling and fatigue has set in as I didn't do as much walking as I did hanging around.   
I did drive today with no issues.  I've been careful getting in and out of the subruban, and have been pretty lightfooted as I make my way from the snow and ice to the indoors.  Pretty treacherous stuff.  I've moved on to the x-strength tylenol as my pain meds haven't seemed to necessary.  A friend of mine had resurfacing done with Dr. Palmer about a month ago, and has had a pretty similar recovery so far.  He mentioned that a leg press with very light weight has been helpful for ROM.  Any other ideas or suggestions for getting the flexibility working?

todd

Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

Tarhoo2

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 108
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2009, 11:16:48 PM »
Knowing that I would be going through it twice, I bought a recumbent cycle, which provided a pretty good workout without violating the 90-degree rule (no longer a constraint).  I need to drag my elliptical trainer back out and get to work on it, but right now I'm doing 40-50 minutes per day on the cycle, walking 45 minutes to 1 hour, or both, pretty much every day.  My doctor does not want me to run until I reach the 12-month mark, which will be in April.

Tekka

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 162
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2009, 12:02:13 AM »
Hey Todd,

I appreciate your journey, i'm due my LBHR 23/01/09... two weeks earlier than expected, it's been helpfull tracking your nine days. I would be happy if i can have a similar recovery to you.

Keep posting please.

Cheers

Terry
LBHR 23/01/2009 Mr Mcminn

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2009, 02:34:49 AM »
Terry,

Good luck to you!  During my evening pt exercises I realized that I had pushed it too hard today.  My legs were fatigued as it was, and I hadn't iced much today.  As I mentioned in an earlier post, I was up and around most of the day--more than any previous.  I was lying on the bed doing straight leg abduction (scissors) when the operated leg cramped and cramped good.  I know when you get a cramp in the calf you pull up on the toes to help clear it.  I had no idea how to clear up a leg abduction type cramp.  Breathed through it and realized that I had crossed the line.  Ice like crazy before bed, and I think I'll be a bit more gentle tomorrow.  I've been told by many to listen to what my body is telling me during recovery.  This was a good case in point.  Go into your surgery with a positive attitude and know that it is going to take some time--Each day you will reach a new milestone.  (I didn't get out of the bed until the next day).  Slow, steady, forward progress.  Let me know how you are doing prior to and after the surgery.

todd
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

Todd

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2009, 04:04:24 PM »
1/19/09 +12 days

After my "overdoing" it on day 10, on day 11 I decided take it easier and focused more on simple movement rather than working on finding my limits.  That was a good decision I think.  In addition to my daily dozen exercises, I was able to do a 1/2 mile session both morning and evening on the treadmill.  It certainly wasn't fast, but it sure helps to stride out and move.  I iced thoroughly as always.  Overall, my swelling is minimal now.  I do feel the baseball bulge on the hip especially after working it, but not much of an issue--I was able to put on some jeans yesterday.  Finally slept through the night and able to sleep on my side.  I haven't needed pain meds during the day yesterday, and only took tylenol before bed, so that is a bonus.  I'm going to schedule real PT sometime this week, and we'll see how that goes.  I don't know quite what to expect or if I'm actually ready.  Although I like to have my cane with me just to walk without limping, I am able to get around without it now.  It seems I spend more time looking for where I left it in the house than actually using it while at home.  Outside the house it is nice to use just for the stability and aid especially as the leg gets fatigued.  No big push to get rid of it until I feel I can walk without limping--might as well begin walking like a human again rather than waddling like a duck. 
todd 
Todd  LBHR, Dr. David Palmer 1/7/09; RBHR 5/6/09 St. Croix Orthopedics, Stillwater, MN

Tekka

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 162
Re: Todd's Bilateral Story...as it happens
« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2009, 10:45:14 PM »
Todd man,

You seem to be making great progress, i had my pre-op accessment today and i was so impressed with how detailed the whole process was and i feel so much happier now, ready for Friday.

So correct me if i'm reading this wrong....you are now off your crutches and using a cane !!! Mr McMinn expects crutches for six weeks before the use of cane, when do you feel you will be ready to go back to work " obviously your job could be physical".

Cheers mate

Terry
LBHR 23/01/2009 Mr Mcminn

 

Recent Posts

Advertisements

Donate Thru Pay Pal

Surface Hippy Gear

Accordion Player Pat Webmaster/Owner

Owner/Webmaster of Surface Hippy

Statcounter

View My Stats

Powered by EzPortal