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Author Topic: Not ready for surgery yet...Comments/Stories welcome about life before your BHR.  (Read 5661 times)

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Bobbi5

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I am 36 y/o male that is barreling down the highway of Hip Replacement/Resurfacing. 

Just looking for others to share their stories/comments/advice/questions/etc about their experiences before surgery.  I appreciate everyone's insight and really want to thank Pat and everyone in advance for all the help/insight I have gotten already from the site and forum.  Thanks.
 
My short story:
The pain started about 2 years ago.  The original injury can be attributed to a self-defense/mma training drill that did not go my way.  Wasn't too bad at first but over the course of a few months it got to the point where the Dr. referred me to an ortho.  The ortho originally diagnosed me with FAI and did an arthoscopy and femoroplasty which helped slightly.  Pain level then started to increase overall which takes me to where I am today.  It hurts when I run, hurts sometimes to walk with my kids, and just generally hurts to move it most times.  OA has taken over the joint and while I am not bone on bone, some days the pain is real bad. 

Right now I think I have finally entered the "acceptance" stage of my grieving, although I still have a sprinkling of anger/denial/depression mixed in most days just to keep things interesting.  I am trying as best as I can to have a a positive mindset about my hip but as you all know, I am finding that difficult most days.  My main concern/frustration is that this is going to stop me from doing my job (high level of activity and strength is required) and that I'll end up in a wheelchair at an early age due to the need for multiple revisions going forward. 

So, If anyone wants to share their story, give some advice, or make fun of me then I welcome your comments !! 

hernanu

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Hi, first - welcome to the site, talking about this will help you to make a good decision.

 My thread has my story http://surfacehippy.info/hiptalk/index.php?topic=2010.0 but basically, my pre-surgery hip story is:

I am 54 years old, male and have spent quite a bit of time doing athletics of different types. I've done 35 years of martial arts (mostly Tae Kwon Do), played soccer competitively until last year, and a good amount of weight training.

I noticed about seven years ago that my flexibility was declining rapidly. Where before I could easily touch my head to my knees, now I was having trouble touching the floor. The groin pain started around then, so I went into the Doctor's and physical therapy with what I thought were muscular issues. We checked for everything - Lyme disease, all sorts of issues. None of the therapy, massage, etc. seemed to do anything, so we checked for osteo issues. seven years ago, they found my right hip slightly arthritic (they thought) and my left had normal amounts of cartilage.

The pain worsened, to the point that three years ago, I could not walk up stairs (or down) without severe pain. I still continued playing soccer until two years ago, when my left hip started dislocating when I ran, and I would have to pop it back into place.

I figured it was time to do something about it, so I had the first surgeon look at it. My left hip had no cartilage, and had developed bone spurs. My right hip had very little cartilage, so it was just a matter of time. I scheduled a hip resurfacing with Dr. Snyder on August 24, 2010.

The surgery went well, took about 2.5 hours and was done under full anesthesia. I woke up and was well enough to stand up with a walker about four hours after the surgery. I felt so good due to the absence of pain from my left hip that I didnít need the Oxycontin they prescribed after the anesthesia wore off. I was on a Tylenol Plus regimen (every six hours), a blood thinner, aspirin and vitamins.  I was up the next day and walking using a walker, walking with the physical therapist. The following day, I was on crutches and being trained on how to use them, stairs, the right way to walk with them, etc. On the third day, I was released from the hospital to my parents, who had decided to help me the first week.

I had the second done on Nov 29th, with a very good outcome.

The years before the surgeries were filled with increasing pain. My activities dropped by the wayside: first went kicking in martial arts, then bag work (hips were too painful), then basketball (active in leagues and pickup), started losing some weight training and any intense treadmill / stairmaster work, then I stopped yoga and finally, out of stuborness and love for the game - soccer. Stairs became a real problem, traveling for work, I had problems getting into a tub shower (tub wall was too high), getting in and out of cars (tiny taxis in foreign countries were especially excruciating), I could go on, but all of us have stories. I felt old and tired and angry.

All that is gone for me. I'm not saying you don't have a lot to consider and timing to think of, but the surgeries are the best things I've ever done for myself. I took five years to come to a decision and take the plunge,  should have done it sooner, but we all do it when it seems right. Good luck, I consider myself lucky to have had such a good option to a serious problem.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2011, 03:09:51 PM by hernanu »
Hernan, LHR 8/24/2010, RHR 11/29/2010 - Cormet, Dr. Snyder

nekko

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Hi Rbt,

I am 51, 2 weeks post op. 2 years ago,  I was diagnosed with OA on the left hip. I am also a self-defense and Karate practitioner and I could not imagine stopping this. I have experimented the 2 levels of mental situations, when getting my first X-rays diagnosis:

Deny (No. Why me ?. I am too young for a THP. I will try to wait until I will go better... ) 
Acceptance (OK. That's the way it is. Lets build an action plan to find the best possible solution to the problem) My target was to be back on the tatami about one year after surgery.

My first search was about finding the right surgeon that can offer some alternative solution to THP. Resurfacing is not so common in my country (I live in France) compared to UK or USA. Most of the surgeons are "THP" minded and I have to meet 3 of these gentlemen. The last one was the right one. He did personally more that 250 hip resurfacings and knows very well the problem of martial artists, dancers, and active people with early OA. I immediately got total confidence with him.

So, two years ago before talking surgery, he proposed me SYNVISCtm injections in the hip joint, in order to save some time before surgery.This acts as a bumper but doesn't create any new cartilage. I had one injection every 6 months and it has helped me a to get back some range of motion. Unfortunately, pain has increased drastically at the beginning of this year and I was ready in my head to apply for a resurfacing. I cannot use the injections indefinitely.

There are dozens of fantastic people on this site who had similar stories and they share also their experience (and their pain too).
I must say that this has been a great help for me before and after surgery. Another point is to establish a good and understandable communication with your surgeon.You must have total confidence with him. I know it is not really obvious because most of us are not especially medically trained.

Good luck Man !



Conserve+ cemented, May 12-2011, Pr Migaud, CHu Lille

Lopsided

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hurts sometimes to walk with my kids ... anger/denial/depression ... My main concern/frustration is that this is going to stop me from doing my job (high level of activity and strength is required) and that I'll end up in a wheelchair at an early age due to the need for multiple revisions going forward.

Don't get angry or depressed. That ain't going to help. Be resigned to it, get resurfaced with a good device and good surgeon, and enjoy the whole process.

And then you will enjoy walking with your children, and running and playing sports with them too.

I don't know what job you do. You perhaps could continue with MMA, but you might want to moderate your activity, not because you have a bad hip, but because you are not twenty and indestructible any more.

D.



Proud To Be Dr. De Smet's First Uncemented Conserve Plus, Left, August 2010

hipnhop

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I was diagnosed with severe OA on both hips three years ago. I continued my life in pain, especially after running. I pushed as hard as I could but could not run past 6 miles.  I could not mount my bike, get into a car, and enjoy sex the way I wanted to.

 I had a Cortisone shot to relieve pain in Oct on 2010. It destroyed the little cartilage I had remaining in my right hip.  I went form bad to worse.  I could no longer walk and used crutches for six months, up to the date of my surgery. I am 10 weeks post op. My right hip is feeling great. I''m, walking , swimming, riding my bike. Can't wait to get my left hip done so I can be totally pain free.

Don't live in pain.
3/2011 and 2/2012 HR Dr. Craig Thomas

einreb

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I am 36 y/o male that is barreling down the highway of Hip Replacement/Resurfacing. 

I'm only a few years older.  I completely sympathize with your decision making process.  that being said... the degenerative nature of the hip for those facing surgery may help you rationalize the decision to go ahead.

I put it off for a several years and worked through the pain... crabby and miserable.  I almost got to the point that resurfacing may have not been an option had I waited another year.  I'm 3 months out from surgery and feel FANTASTIC.

Pulling the trigger can be quite the mind game... especially for younger patients.
40yo at the time of my 2/16/2011 left hip uncemented Biomet resurface with Tri Spike Acetabular cup by Gross

Eitan

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I hear you Bro.  I am now 49.  All was good for me till 3 years ago when running on a treadmill I had an ''explosion'' in my left groin.  I knew something was terribly wrong when over the next few nights I had terrible irradiating pain down my thigh.  I had an X ray which showed a slightly decreased left hip joint space, but also subtle signs of what you had (ie FAI).  I ended up getting a cortisone shot which really helped.  I went back to all my activities, including wrestling and ''no Gi'' ju jitsu.  1.5 years later the pain came back.  I got a 2nd shot-pain gone.  9 months later pain back, 3rd shot-pain gone.  (You see where this is going).  Anyway, Oct 2010 pain was back, deep in the groin, and I knew I was out of time.  I did try one last shot, (my 5th) worked for about 3 days.  Had new X Rays, and now I was bone on bone.  I had already consulted a good HR surgeon 3 years ago, and had a pretty good rapport with him.  I have been aware of resurfacing for quite a while, and I felt that it was my only realistic option for getting back to the high impact sports that I like to do.  That being said I will say this:  From Oct to March, while I was getting things arranged so that I could have surgery I was in terrible pain that I would not wish on my worst enemy.  I sometimes had so much pain I could not eat, could not think straight, and I had trouble sleeping at night.  By the time I got to surgery I would have accepted never to do sports again as long as the pain stopped.  I was operated March 7th 2011.  I am now doing pretty well.  I can now hop on the operated leg, I can run short distances, I can even sprint a bit.  I still have a lot of pain and stiffness in the am.  I have not yet returned to Ju jitsu and wrestling, but  G-d willing I will.  I wish you best of luck in your research, and let me know if there's any other info I can give you.

Eitan

newdog

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I am old compared to some of you youngsters. 55 years old in January 2011 when I had both hips done. But I was one who never let my age get in the way of what I wanted to do. I was never in denial of my age, it's just that I found people are able to do activities much later in life than what I think most of the population is aware of.

I noticed my ROM getting much less about 5 years ago. At that time I had no pain but noticed stiffness after physical activities. Bring out the ibuprofen! Hey, after all I'm 50 years old, right? I brought it to the attention of my doc when I went for my annual. He sent me for x-rays and found that I had osteoarthritis in both hips. Still had cartilage and not bone on bone yet.

About 3 years ago the pain started in my left hip. A sharp pinching in the groin area. Mostly when I walked. I put up with it for about a year then told my doc things are getting worse. More x-rays. The doc said I had moderate to advanced arthritis and sent me to an orthopedic surgeon in our area. I honestly thought my problem with the sharp pain in the left hip had to be something damaged or torn and an ortho doc could just go in and fix it. The ortho confirmed what my regular doc diagnosed. Arthritis was causing the bad pain. He couldn't believe there was no pain in the right hip. He had nothing to offer me other than to say I would be back in 1 or 2 years for a THR. No mention of HR even though there is someone in our area who just started performing HR. At this time I never heard of hip resurfacing. I left his office stunned and devastated. About 2 months after seeing him the right hip started to hurt and eventually became worse than the left.

For about 1 year life was not good mentally. Anger, grouchiness, short temper. Depression. I did not know what to do or what would become of my life. I didn't want a THR because I am a very active and physical person. Plus it seems most docs advise waiting until you just can't stand the pain anymore then get it done. That's what the THR surgeon advised me to do. In other words give up everything in your life that you enjoy doing for years then get THR done. Hiking, backpacking, bike riding, kayaking on fast streams, an occasional run for the fun of it, gone. What was even worse was not going for walks with my wife, avoiding stairs, avoiding shopping in stores especially at Christmas. I stayed home a lot. Tired of people asking me "What's wrong, why are you limping?"

What pulled the trigger for me? About 1 year ago I was searching on the net for any kind of treatment that may be of some hope to at least lesson the pain and misery. I came upon Vicky Marlow's HR site. I learned about HR and knew it was for me. At this time I was walking slowly, slightly bent over and always in pain. After some research I found Dr. Gross and went for it. No looking back, it had to be done. I couldn't go on living the way I was.

Do the research, find an experienced surgeon. You will know when it is time, but don't wait too long. 4 1/2 months post op for me and life is so much better. When you commit to getting the surgery it is actually very exciting and something to look forward to.
Steve, Dr. Gross bilateral, uncemented Biomet, January 10 & 12, 2011, Columbia S.C.

Lori Cee

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I'm 34 at the end of this year and have just recently had both hips 'fixed'.  I had Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis as a child and have had significant damage in both hips since this time.  Osteo was left behind to degenerate the joints further.  The joints had been bone on bone for at least ten years and I found ways to live life and avoid surgery.  Since I'd never really had the opportunity to be involved in any really active pursuits, I really didn't think I was missing out (and had convinced myself that there were a lot of different things that I just didn't want to do).

Over the space of the last few years, I had really noticed that my physical condition was declining and the amount I could do on a day to day basis really was becoming limited.  I couldn't walk as far without suffering for days after and I was just starting to realise that some things were just too hard and maybe I was participating in these activities for the last time.  (I remember saying to my husband when we went to a concert last year that I didn't think that I could do it again, the walk was too much, the stairs were too much and there wasn't enough space between the rows for me to sit comfortably and prepare for getting out of the venue.  This is just one example of many)  This condition had started to infringe on the reasonably sedentary activities that I enjoyed and was eating away at the list more and more. It wasn't a big deal that I couldn't tie shoelaces any more, I just got slip on shoes.  It wasn't a big deal that I couldn't go grocery shopping today because I was too tired and too sore.  All these little things on their own, I had convinced myself were not a big deal but together they had become a big deal.  I had to consider how long I would be standing when going to any function, plan my daily activities carefully to use the energy and limit of my joints to maximise what I could get done and realise that I had to sacrifice some daily activities to get others done. 

OA is degenerative and as time progresses, you are right, you won't be able to do that physical job that you love anymore.  It just comes down to time and what you are prepared to give up before you fix the problem.  Personally I wouldn't wait until the disease has put you in a wheelchair.  Based on the condition of my joints, I had also been given an estimate of 2 - 3 years by both Rheumatologist and the Surgeon before I was at that point.  I had a choice to wait.  I chose not to.

Revisions are likely in my future but what I realised is that if I can improve my quality of life for ten - fifteen years for a few months worth of discomfort, it would be worth it.  There is always the chance that my BMHR's will last longer.  The thing is that even though I am still rehabilitating, the pain is gone, I stand taller and straighter, my ROM has increased dramatically, my gait has significantly improved and I've barely started on my journey to this new life.  I believe that the reason my rehabilitation is taking so much longer than many others is that I waited too long.  Some of the muscles that are now being worked haven't been used in over a decade.  I've compensated for broken down joints for so long that my body needs to be trained on how to walk properly and move properly.  Even though it will take me longer, it will still be worth it. 

If you keep reading some of the old threads on this discussion board you will read stories of the things that have changed in people's lives because of their diseased hips and how positive resurfacing has been for them.  You'll known when the time is right for you.  When you decide and go through this process, there will be a day soon after when you realise that you are so glad that you have done it. 
Bilateral Birmingham Mid Head Resection (BMHR): 8 April 2011 (Dr Simon Journeaux at Mater Private).
To follow my progress visit my blog: Bilateral Hip Replacement

katekosar

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My story is essentially the same as everyone else's, I guess.  I am a big woman, 6'1" tall, and despite the fact that it is hard on my joints, I am a long-distance runner.  I've done about a dozen marathons, an equal number of half marathons, a ton of road races, triathlons, distance biking, you name it.  All of it as a back-of-the-pack older woman, but I loved every one of those races.  My favorite race is the Walt Disney World Marathon in Orlando the first weekend in January.  I have about 10 medals from that event alone.

So I ran all the time, swam a lot, biked, did some weight work, and was really really happy until I began to notice my left hip hurting.  So I'd stretch it out from time to time on my runs.  The pain would start to emanate up my back and down my hamstring.  Then later on I couldn't stretch it out.  It hurt pretty much full time when I ran.  Then it started hurting during the normal course of my life.  I had a fairly decent orthopedic guy at the Cleveland Clinic, and he'd recommend PT and injections, and that kept me going for a while.

I remember very clearly the moment I could no longer run for the pain.  It was devastating.  I sat down on the side of the trail and bawled my eyes out.  Still, it took me several more years of hobbling around until I finally found the surgeon who I trusted to do the replacement.

I'm five weeks out now, and I feel fantastic.  There is hope again in my life, and it is priceless. 

Good luck to you as you make your decision.

Kate

Dannywayoflife

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Hi mate,
            im in a very similar position to your self im 28 have FAI and OA in my left hip(although i had some xrays done this week and i still have some joint space although it dont fell like it to me!) I have been competative fighter and trained in mma and no gi grappeling for about 5 years.
I also work in  a demanding job and have gone through most of the imotions that you describe. Add in the fact that i have a very obstructive GP (ive been refered to a osteo who specialises in spinal surgery before he will send me to a RS specialist!!)
But this site is a great and is full of people who are simmilar to us and take part in demanding sports and have demanding jobs and most of them seem to be doing great.
From what i have gathered the single most inportant thing to nail down is get the best most experienced surgeon that you can find. Who uses a proven device with a good track record.
Where abouts are you?
I hope that you find this great site as helpfull and inspireing as i do!
All the best
Danny
Train hard fight easy
LBHR 10/11/2011 Mr Ronan Treacy Birmingham England
60mm cup 54mm head
Rbhr 54mm head 60mm cup 12/02/15 Ronan Treacy ROH Birmingham England
;)

Bobbi5

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Thanks to everyone who has posted thus far for their stories/suggestions/questions/advice.  It's really nice to know this is not the end of the road and that there is reason to be hopeful.  Sounds like everyone has really had a great experience with their own individual BHR thus far.  For those of you still recovering, I wish you all a speedy and successful recovery.   

Your responses are exactly what I was hoping to get out of this post and look forward to reading more and more stories/experiences of others.  Hopefully, if there are others on the fence this will help them to find a starting point as well.  To answer a few of the questions asked of me I listed some additional information about me below. 

I am a police officer so obviously want to be as physically fit as possible.  So far I am still able to do my job with no limitations.  I live in Michigan, USA and right now I am trying to get and appointment with Dr. Peter Brooks of the Cleveland Clinic.  I had just recently decided that I can no longer tolerate/ignore the pain and "sucking it up" is not really an option, at least in the long term.  So, that being said I am now doing my research on Doctors and components.  Again, all suggestions/advice/warnings/jokes are welcome. 

I did have a question that I am hoping those who have had the procedure can elaborate on.  In terms of pain and discomfort, when did you have enough and decide it was time?  For example, I went to the zoo today and walked, rather uncomfortably and in pain, for about 3 hours.  After I get home and stretch it out I am OK for the rest of the night.  So, in my opinion since I can take the pain it's not yet time for surgery.  I know I need to be smart about this and not wait too long so that it may prevent me from being a candidate for resurfacing but, really, when do you know it's time? 

Also, I've only been to my family physician and my orthopedic, who doesn't do BHR, so my last two questions.  First, would you recommend going to a rheumatologist as well and second, would you recommend making multiple appointments with potential surgeons at the same time? 

Thanks again.  Being that us in the US are coming up on Memorial Day I would be remiss if I did not thank all veterans and their families for their service and sacrifice.  Thank you!


DGossack

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Well I haven't had my surgery yet but it is scheduled for August 1st, a week after I celebrate my 50th.  (Happy birthday to me).

I was always very active with running as a base.  I also was heavily into triathlons for several years before starting my own company 20 years ago.  Needless to say I didn't have the time to train anymore.  But I was still active with running, biking, golf, etc.

About 10 years ago I was in a car crash.  I broke a bone in my right ankle.  My doctor told me I should stop running so I did.  I did bike and walk but noticed I was losing range of motion in my left hip.  I had trouble getting down on my aero bars on the bike.  My left hip and back would be very tight.

As I became less active my hip caused me more problems. I would have trouble sitting for long periods.  I would have lots of pain on walks.  I just assumed it was because I was not in good shape and hadn't stretched.  People would notice that I was limping even when I didn't notice pain.  I was compensating without realizing.

Last year I met  my girlfriend who swims, bikes, runs (but has never done a triathlon?).  I decided to get back in shape.  So I had to try to solved this left hip.  I tried massage with some relief.  I tried stretching which helped a little.  And I started biking again but was misaligned to open my left hip.  I tried to run but it was too painful.

Finally I went to the doctor.  The x-rays should severe OA in the left hip and a little in the right.  I was referred to an orthopedic who was shocked I was as active as I was on the hip.  He recommended to continue doing what I was until I couldn't stand the pain.  Then...wait for it...come see him for a THR.  No mention of hip resurfacing.  Needless to say I was depressed.

An internet search for ways to live with my OA led me to this site and others on HR.  I was hopeful again.  I met with my doctor to discuss my findings and told him I assumed the ortho didn't know about HR.  He told me the ortho noted in my file that I wasn't a good candidate for HR.  Depression again.

I sent my x-rays to Dr. Pritchett in Seattle that I found on this site.  After reviewing my x-rays and a followup consult with x-rays he concluded I was an ideal candidate.  So I have my surgery scheduled.

I am taking the advice of many people in this site and not waiting too long.  I can still bike (although getting on the bike is getting more difficult), swim, hike, golf, etc.  But I also know that my range of motion is decreasing despite stretching and Triggerpoint therapy.  I also am losing strength on the left side.  So I want to have the surgery before I have to spend extra time building muscles back.

Good luck with your research and decision.

Dan
LBHR, Dr. Pritchett, 8/1/2011
fullmetalhip.wordpress.com

23109VC

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Hi!

First, don't be depressed.  What you have can be fixed.  I was in your shoes just a few months ago.  I had my hip resurfaced in February and I feel so good now.  Its a miracle.  Imagine waking up tomorrow and the hip pain is gone.  Totally gone.

  I'm about the same age, I'm now 38.  My hip started hurting me about 10 years ago.  At first it was just a minor ache after major exercise, and a slight reduction in range of motion.  It gradually got worse and I saw a doctor.  I was told I had arthritis and would probably need my hip fixed at some point in the future...  For the past 5 years it hurt a lot....  I gave  all sports because it hurt too much.  I used to pay racquetball several times a week, but I haven't played in over 5 years.  I stopped jogging as that hurt too much as well.  Right before my surgery, I was able to do a stair master but I hurt.  I forced myself to do it so I could get a cardio workout, but it was uncomfortable.

I have three kids..the youngest is only 3 and he was able to outrun me!  I couldnt event play baseball with may 9 year old son because the running or quick moments needed to bat or get the ball hurt.  Pushing my kids in their stroller was painful too... For my hip pushing the stroller uphill was excruciating.  

Dr. Gross was my surgeon.  He thinks I had some kind of impact injury when I was younger which thew things out of whack...and as I aged and exercised it just wore too fast. Part of my hip was bone on boneless

My surgery was something I put off at least a year or so because I was scared to do it.  It got to where I couldnt stand living with the pain, and felt I had no choice.  In retrospect, i wish I had done it much sooner.  The entire process of getting the surgery was not a big deal.  I was scared of the unknown thought it would hurt, was afraid of what might go wrong etc.  Don't do that.  Get it fixed.

I didt see any scary needles,  and I felt no pain before during or after my surgery.  I had a hernia surgery about 5 years ago and that hurt a lot.... The hip resurfacing was far less painful!  I cant tell you to expect with ore doctors but with dr gross... I was never in pain.  Maybe slightly sore." my leg felt weak after surgery...but never did I feel that i was hurting.  Given what I experienced if I ever needed to fix m other hip, I would hesitate for a minute to do itl

I'm about three months post op.  I feel like a million bucks. I have to wait until I am at six months before I can run on it due to the bone ingrowth not being fully done, but I'm telling you I could run now if I had to.  I am going up and down stairs with ease.  I can bend down to tie my shoes no problem".  I have ZERO hip joint pain.  I am not exaggerating when I say that what happened to me is life changing.  Its like I have my life back.  I can push the stroller up steep hills with no pain.  My operated hip feels as good as my "normal" one.  Te only exception is after sitting on it, it is a bit stiff when I first get up.  

We are kind of in the same business.  I am a prosecutor....so we both deal with the bad guys....although I don't have the same physical requirements you do... I am in court..not on the streets.....

As soon as you feel you are limited at work, fix it.  You will need to have sick time saved up to take off for recovery...your not going to be chasing bad guysin there months, you are going to need a good six months before you do hard core physical activity...but maybe they could put you on a desk job while you recover.  But....you can het hip resurfacing and be back to your old self.  

I still am getting stronger, and I will get even better than I am right mow, but I already know the surgery was a major success....I'd almost call it s miracle.  After living with major nonstop 24/7 hip pain...to finally have it gone and feel like I could run, jump, and do whatever I want pain free... It's amazing.  The first few times I walked up stairs or up a Jill and had no pain..it was emotional for me....seriously....

It sucks to feel like you are broken....that's how I felt before surgery.  The pain gets worse....it doesn't get better.....but know that it can be fixed.  Totally fixed.  There are a lot of things that can go wrong with the body that can't be fixed...so I looked at it that way...if this is the worst thing that happens to me, I'll be a lucky person.  I have a close friend who went through cancer....so having a hip go bad isn't really so bad....when you think about it relative to what could go wrong.

Good luck.  You will know when it's time to fix it based on now much pain you are in and how limited you are.  When you are there...fix it.  Pick a good doctor. Hip resurfacing is highly crucial on how well the surgeon puts in the device....you don't want some doctor learning on you...I flew across the country to see Dr. Gross.

Be safe at work.  Feel free to message me if you have more questions.

-Sean
« Last Edit: May 29, 2011, 07:20:34 PM by 23109VC »
Sean
Dr. Gross- Biomet uncemented, 2/23/11

halfdone

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Two additional comments. 1. There are other topics, very similar to this, that you might find useful - like
http://surfacehippy.info/hiptalk/index.php?topic=2294.0
2.  My recovery second time around was smoother and quicker than the first (second was five years later).  There were many differences that could have contributed to this, but I'm sure that because my later op was on a much less disabled hip, my recovery was faster.
There were many good reasons why I waited first time around, too long in retrospect, not the least that HR was still relatively new in the early 2000s and the surgeons were still gaining confidence and expertise.  That consideration no longer applies, particularly if you have access to surgeons like Dr Brooks.
Good luck

Ernie

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I might as well add my voice to the chorus.  I've been a runner and weightlifter all my adult life (I'm 53).  I had pain and reduced range of motion in my right hip beginning in 2005.  Didn't go to a doctor until last fall when I suddenly could no longer run without an excruciating, stabbing pain in the hip.  Xrays showed a bone on bone mess.  By the time of my surgery six months later I was hobbling around with a cane.  I had my hip resurfaced on April 1 and a mere 8 weeks after my hip resurfacing I'm able to walk 6 miles pain free.  I am up to an hour on the elliptical. My upper body strength is almost completely back, and the legs aren't far behind. I feel like I could start running again, but I won't before 6 months at the earliest.  Why risk loosening the device or a femoral neck fracture?  I can wait.  It is just so amazing to have my body working again.  Like Sean I feel very grateful that of all the things that can afflict our bodies, the arthritic hip was something that could be fixed.  So I would encourage you to get it fixed.
Right Hip Resurfaced - Wright Conserve Plus, April 1, 2011 by Dr. Kress, Atlanta, GA

Left Hip Resurfaced - Biomet, May 4, 2015 by Dr. Gross, Columbia, SC

Tin Soldier

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Same as the rest here, pretty much.  41 years old.  Couldn't ride a bike down to the river with the kids to play last summer, was climbing in a tree helping a friend prune it and was totally stove in for several days afterward, stopped playing soccer, couldn't sleep well, became fairly content to drink too much at night, blood pressure rising, barking at the family,.... you get the picture.

Check out my blog,  Near the beginning there is some talk about how I felt before hand, what I was thinking.

http://onehipdude.blogspot.com/

BTW - I haven't been on here much in the last couple weeks, because I'm having fun doing other things.  I think that's a good sign. 

Also - I still have a little anger and depression when seeing my many friends who are 10 years older than me, play soccer.  I might be able to play some day, but I have other interests that will keep me going, like riding the bike to the river with the boys.   
LBHR 2/22/11, RBHR 8/23/11 - Pritchett.

DGossack

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    • Adventures in Hip Resurfacing
Well I haven't had my surgery yet but it is scheduled for August 1st, a week after I celebrate my 50th.  (Happy birthday to me).

I was always very active with running as a base.  I also was heavily into triathlons for several years before starting my own company 20 years ago.  Needless to say I didn't have the time to train anymore.  But I was still active with running, biking, golf, etc.

About 10 years ago I was in a car crash.  I broke a bone in my right ankle.  My doctor told me I should stop running so I did.  I did bike and walk but noticed I was losing range of motion in my left hip.  I had trouble getting down on my aero bars on the bike.  My left hip and back would be very tight.

As I became less active my hip caused me more problems. I would have trouble sitting for long periods.  I would have lots of pain on walks.  I just assumed it was because I was not in good shape and hadn't stretched.  People would notice that I was limping even when I didn't notice pain.  I was compensating without realizing.

Last year I met  my girlfriend who swims, bikes, runs (but has never done a triathlon?).  I decided to get back in shape.  So I had to try to solved this left hip.  I tried massage with some relief.  I tried stretching which helped a little.  And I started biking again but was misaligned to open my left hip.  I tried to run but it was too painful.

Finally I went to the doctor.  The x-rays should severe OA in the left hip and a little in the right.  I was referred to an orthopedic who was shocked I was as active as I was on the hip.  He recommended to continue doing what I was until I couldn't stand the pain.  Then...wait for it...come see him for a THR.  No mention of hip resurfacing.  Needless to say I was depressed.

An internet search for ways to live with my OA led me to this site and others on HR.  I was hopeful again.  I met with my doctor to discuss my findings and told him I assumed the ortho didn't know about HR.  He told me the ortho noted in my file that I wasn't a good candidate for HR.  Depression again.

I sent my x-rays to Dr. Pritchett in Seattle that I found on this site.  After reviewing my x-rays and a followup consult with x-rays he concluded I was an ideal candidate.  So I have my surgery scheduled.

I am taking the advice of many people in this site and not waiting too long.  I can still bike (although getting on the bike is getting more difficult), swim, hike, golf, etc.  But I also know that my range of motion is decreasing despite stretching and Triggerpoint therapy.  I also am losing strength on the left side.  So I want to have the surgery before I have to spend extra time building muscles back.

Good luck with your research and decision.

Dan
LBHR, Dr. Pritchett, 8/1/2011
fullmetalhip.wordpress.com

DGossack

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    • Adventures in Hip Resurfacing
Sorry about the double post.  The site appeared to show that I hadn't posted it hours after I had written it.  Well I hit post again and thus the echo.

Dan
LBHR, Dr. Pritchett, 8/1/2011
fullmetalhip.wordpress.com

bluedevilsadvocate

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Bobbi -

I think that you will feel very comfortable and confident with Dr. Brooks.  He seems to be very much a student of the science of resurfacing.  I assume that you have watched his two video interviews on this website; if not, you should.  Dr. Brooks performed my LBHR last October, and I am very pleased with the results.  I never experienced any pain postsurgery: in the hospital, the nurses would ask periodically throughout the day what my pain level was, on a scale of 1 to 10, and I don't recall ever getting above a 2.  I stopped taking percocet (or whatever the prescription pain reliever was) after less than a day, and used only Tylenol thereafter.  Likewise at home, although I did have some aching in my thighs at night for a while (I'm not sure what that was).  There were no Lovenox (anticlotting) injections; instead, aspirin for several weeks and pneumatic compression devices on the lower legs for 2 weeks (which give a lower leg massage on each leg about once every two minutes --- actually feels rather nice!).  No catheter.  All in all, I have rather fond memories of my 3 nights at Euclid Hospital: virtually no pain, tv with remote, "room service" (the food was really pretty good  :)), wireless internet, room with a view overlooking Lake Erie, friendly and helpful staff.  What more could a guy want??  From my x-ray, the acetabular cup appears to be very much within the proper angle; Dr. Books told me the day after surgery that it is "perfect".

Be aware that Dr. Brooks has one of the more conservative postsurgery protocols: six weeks on 2 crutches, then no impact sports for a year.    But that is absolutely fine, as far as I am concerned; I'd rather be a little too conservative than run the risks attendant to being too aggressive.  I think Mr. McMinn also recommends no impact sports for the first year, and you can't argue with his results!

Much success to you!!
LBHR 10-20-2010
Dr. Brooks - Cleveland Clinic
Age 62 at time of surgery

 

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