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Author Topic: When should you rest, & when should you push?  (Read 3401 times)

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ZAP

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When should you rest, & when should you push?
« on: September 29, 2011, 02:47:41 PM »
Hi guys,

I'm trying to figure out when I'm pushing to much and when to rest and not work out at all.  Yesterday I did my same routine on the bike as I always do and for some reason my IT band down the side of my knee to my lower outside calve  is really sore. To the point I walk with a  large limp. I took some anti inflams and a day off but its still a little sore.

Should I stay off until the pain is completely gone?

Should I go to the gym and work out light on the bike, maybe half the distance and speed?

Should I go back and do my normal workout because its just tight and needs blood flow?

Keep in mind I have not had surgery as of yet and I constantly have sore pain issues due to the arthritis, just never like this after a work out.   Im also scared if I rest to long, my hip and leg muscles are going to freeze and tighten up on me.  I have seen great improvement with my mobility, strength and flexibility since I started working out.

obxpelican

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2011, 03:08:02 PM »
I would give it another day or so, but keep walking and the day you go back to the gym workout 1/2 speed/time.

It's very common for this kind of thing to happen.


Chuck
Chuck
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8-6-08

ZAP

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2011, 03:34:37 PM »
I would say you need to take a day off or 2 of working the leg like you would normally. Don't need to stop all together as for before my surgery I know what it was like to stay mobile just to feel better....

Also weather has a lot to do with arthritis pain, but if it is your muscle just be gentle with it.

Good Luck

T Flippy

Yeah , it feels lime my IT band rubbing against something on the side of my knee down the side of my calve.  My PT said the arthritis is cause the muscles not to track properly.  I'm going to try what you said. Its going to be really hard because working out lite has always felt like a waste a time to me. Its always a 100% or nothing mentality for me.

hernanu

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2011, 04:26:22 PM »
I think before and after you want to listen to your body. If your muscle is irritated, lower the intensity of the workout for that particular area until you feel better. You know the difference between workout muscle soreness and something you need to rest. You want to do as much as you can to keep it active, but not so much you get an injury or continually aggravate it.

If the PT says it's not tracking right, lower the intesity until it's comfortable and then work at that level until the surgery (and recovery) allows you to get back to normal tracking.
Hernan, LHR 8/24/2010, RHR 11/29/2010 - Cormet, Dr. Snyder

maxx6789

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2011, 06:53:35 PM »
for me ... pre-surgery and pre-OA diagnosis, i would get these flare-ups; i thought it was just mild muscle strains. i had to take several days (more like a week or two) off before returning to exercise. after this happened several times, i was diagnosed with OA and needed hip replacements. after getting that news, i cut way back on my exercise routine to the point were it did not cause these flare-ups ... it involved walking (my dog was happy) and the elliptical machine. i think swimming would have been good, too, but i never made it to the pool. exercise and staying active is great but not if what you do causes you to have to miss several days because of overdoing it ... it's a balance.
Left BHR Della Valle, Sept 14, 2011
Right BHR Della Valle, April 4, 2012

ZAP

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2011, 07:29:07 PM »
for me ... pre-surgery and pre-OA diagnosis, i would get these flare-ups; i thought it was just mild muscle strains. i had to take several days (more like a week or two) off before returning to exercise. after this happened several times, i was diagnosed with OA and needed hip replacements. after getting that news, i cut way back on my exercise routine to the point were it did not cause these flare-ups ... it involved walking (my dog was happy) and the elliptical machine. i think swimming would have been good, too, but i never made it to the pool. exercise and staying active is great but not if what you do causes you to have to miss several days because of overdoing it ... it's a balance.

Walking hurts the most. My hip blows up like a balloon. Last time I went to the supermarket to pic up a couple things and had to give up and put down the basket. I couldn't make it to the check out lines.  Or, I new If I made it to the check out lines, I would never make it back to my car in the parking lot.
I tried the elliptical, and after 10 minutes, the same thing happens.

The pain I go through feels like my IT band is rubbing out of place.  I can work out through it, but about a 1hr after, I get inflame spots starting from hip all the way down to just below the knee. 

Do any of you know how to fix muscle tracking problems?

Tin Soldier

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2011, 08:39:59 PM »
I know nothing about muscle tracking.  Sounds interesting though.

Before surgery for me, I pretty much pushed everything until it hurt and then it was always one of those "overdid it" moments.  In pain for several days and hobbling worse than usual.  I think Zap, you may be similar to me in that regard.  I never put a lot of fuss into pre-surgery damage, though.  I assumed my joints were hosed anyway and was under the assumption that soft-tissue will either get fixed (like cleaning up a labrum or fully removing it) and over time, with PT after surgery, the soft-tissue would repair.  With both surgeries, I had less pain after the surgery and all the soft-tissue stuff seemed to go away after a couple months.  Also, I didn't do my pre-op exercises like I was supposed to do, but I don't know if it would have helped me much.

Post-op is a different story for me.  I heed what my PT says and generally if you have pain (not bone/joint pain) from a workout and it lasts for a day or so, that's good.  General rule of thumb, if it hurts for more than 2 days then it was too much.
LBHR 2/22/11, RBHR 8/23/11 - Pritchett.

Aerial

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2011, 09:50:06 PM »
I can really relate to this post.  I have always been very active but hip is "shot" at this point and I am awaiting surgery.  I continue to try to find the balance between doing too much and not doing enough.  I get really tight really fast if  I don't do anything and I feel so much better if I do something.  For me, elliptical and light yoga work well along with an occasional spin class.  Too much spinning makes me hurt as does doing the elliptical and then doing something like mowing the yard.  I am really listening to my body and have finally begun to acknowledge my limitations which was really hard for awhile.  If you hurt afterwards keep the intensity down and take a few days off.  No sense hurting, be true to yourself!
« Last Edit: September 29, 2011, 09:52:29 PM by Aerial »
Right hip resurfacing with Dr. Gross on 12/5/11!

DGossack

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2011, 12:24:23 AM »
Just to clarify that the IT band goes from just under the gluteous maximus to just under the knee.  The pain is generally on the outside of the knee to the outside of the thigh and occasionally just below the front of the knee.  This is from inflammation caused by constant rubbing as the band moves across the femur.

I found that I also got pain all the way down to my ankle and up in my back.  I believe that this is from modifying my gait to avoid the pain in my hip.  As I modified my gait I strained and fatigued muscles that were not used to having to work so hard.  And of course the worse my hip got the worse the other pain became as I contorted my body.

Prior to surgery I did as much as I could.  In some cases I was bent over and hobbled for hours after working out.  I knew that I wasn't doing permanent damage to anything.  I figured the weight control, strength, and flexibility I gained would be beneficial post surgery.  Also I needed it because it is cheaper than psychotherapy.  ;D

I know what pain is good pain and what pain is "Oh no I really hurt something" pain.  I also seem to have a higher pain toleranace than most people.

I would definitely not stop doing anything unless you severely injure something.  The movement is good.  Remember you are tearing the muscles and if you sit around they will mend in their contracted position.  This means less flexibility and strength later.  I like your idea of going half speed even if it doesn't feel like you are doing anything.  I love aqua jogging for just that reason.

Best wishes as you prepare mentally, physically, and spiritually for your procedure.

Dan
LBHR, Dr. Pritchett, 8/1/2011
fullmetalhip.wordpress.com

Anniee

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2011, 12:48:34 AM »

Prior to surgery I did as much as I could.  In some cases I was bent over and hobbled for hours after working out.  I knew that I wasn't doing permanent damage to anything.  I figured the weight control, strength, and flexibility I gained would be beneficial post surgery.  Also I needed it because it is cheaper than psychotherapy.

Dan, I'm with you 100%, I am currently doing as much as I can for the same reasons, and I do sometimes hobble for quite a while after my work out.  I need this to keep my sanity, particularly in the last month!  We are changing over to a complete new computer system where I work on October 1, and it definitely is not ready at this time.  Dealing with this change-over, plus trying to get ready for my second surgery in less than 2 weeks is stressful, to say the least!  Going to the gym helps me not shoot or bark at people, and I do think keeping as much in shape physically as I can will help my recovery.

Most of the time, I can work out on the elliptical at the lowest setting without too much problem.  This also seems to actually help my bad hip.  If I do not do anything, it hurts more.  If I get on it, and my hip is still really painful after about 10 minutes, I get off and rest for a day.
Annie/ Right Uncemented Biomet 4-20-11/Left Uncemented Biomet 10-12-11/Dr. Gross

Luanna

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2011, 01:36:09 AM »
I had the same questions about how much to walk and exercise. I'm kind of a wimp and have tried to push a bit but that means doing my PT exercises 3 times a day and walking around my neighborhood twice a day - very low key for me. I also wanted to find out what causes femoral neck fractures and avoid doing anything that might cause that to happen. Sounds like those are extremely rare.

Anyway, I emailed Dr. Pritchett's assistant and here was her response:
 
"You should be walking as much as you want to be.  Sorry, if that sounds vague but there isnít a set amount or distance that you should have reached at this point. The important thing is to be moving and it is common to be sore after activity.  Your body is relearning to move with the new hip and without compensating for a bad one.  So, as with any ďnewĒ activity, there is bound to be some soreness, possibly some swelling (use ice, elevation and ibuprofen).
 
I donít know about the percentage of femoral next fractures but you could ask Dr. Pritchett when you come in for your 8 week appointment.  The good news is that we donít see them very often at all which would be why I donít know how many there are. Susan"

I'd like to push a little more but will wait till the 6 week mark. Anyone find riding an stationary bike soothing after surgery? It was the only exercise that didn't cause hip pain prior to surgery.

Luanna
RHR 8/30/2011 - Dr. Pritchett - Stryker Trident Shell /X3 Poly liner acetabular cup. BHR head.

MattBrunner

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2011, 02:16:27 AM »
Zap, I had the same questions as I was waiting...waiting..waiting for the big day to come.  I did my elliptical for 30 mins and I couldn't sleep because of the pain.

As the hip got worse by every week I also had the same issue with my IT band because my hip was moving in the socket.  My suggestion is move to lower impact activities like in the pool that is what it did for the last few weeks before surgery.

Matt

DGossack

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2011, 02:55:25 AM »
Wow I am proud of you elliptical people.  I could not do the elliptical.  Maybe I started too late in the OA progression.

For me biking was one of the best.  It started out a little stiff but would loosen up.  I did lots of spinning to start.  Swimming was good but didn't really work the legs.  And even swimming hurt, probably because of the flip turns.

Aqua jogging has been awesome in recovery and rehab.  After pushing it with my exercises or walking or on the exercise bike it really let's the hip work with the impact or weight bearing.  You can go through great range of motion.  I wish I would have started it before surgery.

I would say we tend to do too little when pain starts more than too much.  The body can handle quite a bit.  I would definitely recommend getting yourself in the best shape you can to make recovery and rehab that much quicker and better.

Dan
LBHR, Dr. Pritchett, 8/1/2011
fullmetalhip.wordpress.com

Tin Soldier

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2011, 10:34:06 PM »
Ellipitical, biking, walking, it all hurt prior to surgery.  It's all gone now, well accept for the recovery stuff on the right side, but that's subsiding.  I mentioned this before, but the miniscule 20 minutes on the recumbent in the PT's office feels so good now, before surgery the left was good but the right was so painful at the top of the stroke.  I couldn't appreciate my new left hip.  Now I can appreciate both.
LBHR 2/22/11, RBHR 8/23/11 - Pritchett.

ZAP

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2011, 11:20:30 PM »
Just to clarify that the IT band goes from just under the gluteous maximus to just under the knee.  The pain is generally on the outside of the knee to the outside of the thigh and occasionally just below the front of the knee.  This is from inflammation caused by constant rubbing as the band moves across the femur.


Dan

THATS EXACTLY WHAT I HAVE.  I just finished using half a tube of this anti inflame/pain cream.     I thought I could correct it completely my self but after talking to a doc, PT, chiropractor , etc They all said the same thing. I can only limit it but the arthritis is causing it. The muscles are protect the impact and rub of the arthritis they're contracting wrong and the wrong muscles are being over used, which in return is twisting and raising my hip pulling on my IT Band. It hurts more then the joint pain.  Its hard to figure out. I will have a great week with hardly any pain, then the next week 5 out of the 7 days Im hobbling around in pain. If I could figure out the formula I'd be golden up to surgery.
My Chiropractor even went as so far to tell me to stop coming in and paying money. He said he can correct it but the arthritis is going to pull it right back. So  he recommends starting again 3 months before surgery and literally train for it.

ZAP

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2011, 11:24:11 PM »
Zap, I had the same questions as I was waiting...waiting..waiting for the big day to come.  I did my elliptical for 30 mins and I couldn't sleep because of the pain.

As the hip got worse by every week I also had the same issue with my IT band because my hip was moving in the socket.  My suggestion is move to lower impact activities like in the pool that is what it did for the last few weeks before surgery.

Matt

Did you have your surgery? Did the IT Band Issue go away? If so how long did it take to go back to normal?

MattBrunner

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Re: When should you rest, & when should you push?
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2011, 05:51:56 AM »
Hi Zap,

Yes, I am 8 weeks post Op and in Zero pain and no IT band issues.  The pain was all about the hip being loose in the joint. 

Don't get me wrong the first 2 weeks post op were difficult and the PT was work but at 8 weeks I am about 80%.  Today I did  5 miles at my gym today and no pain at all.  You will be so happy when you have the new hip and back to moving without any pain.

I remember not wanting to go to the gym because everything hurt.  I look forward to hearing about your recovery.

Matt

 

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