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Author Topic: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery  (Read 1072 times)

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Rn2md

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Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« on: February 16, 2019, 08:14:33 PM »
Hey,

Just wanted to poll the group on the level of severity/description of symptoms when they finally decided to do the surgery?
Obviously everyone is different but just wanted to get a sense.
Thanks

John C

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2019, 12:44:02 AM »
1st surgery: Fairly severe limp for at least 10 years. Gave up tennis and surfing due to pain and lack of mobility 10 years before surgery. I still taught skiing all day, every day, all winter; and windsurfing every day all summer, both with varying degrees of pain and reduced range of motion. I had not been able to lay my knee down flat on the floor for at least ten years. I tried arthroscopic surgery that postponed replacement for a few years, as well as a few PRP injections. The final blow for me was when I had a stem cell injection that went bad, and left me on crutches, unable to walk or even swim. I had the surgery two months after the injection.
2nd hip 10 years later: Some symptoms for about seven years. Limped and could not lay the knee down straight for about 5 years. I was still able to ski, play tennis, surf, and windsurf, with occasional very sharp pains and limited range of motion. Always ached in the evening in direct proportion to the days activities, sometimes fairly severe during the last three years. Limp was pretty bad the last few years.

I certainly would have done both surgeries many years sooner if I knew how great the results were going to be, but I knew that there are no guarantees, just percentages. I was willing to deal with a lot of pain to not risk that slight percentage of losing my primary sports.
John/ Left uncemented Biomet/ Dr Gross/ 6-16-08
Right uncemented Biomet/Dr Gross/ 4/25/18

Philbrd

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2019, 11:35:30 AM »
I am 3 weeks post op with Dr. Gross and doing well.  I know exactly how you feel. 

For my case, about 5 years ago i was running 20 miles a week, a marathon a year, playing hockey, skiing, hiking, etc.   I had pain in my right hip and went to the ortho.  They told me i would be a candidate for a hip replacement and i was pretty shocked and frankly did not believe it.   2-3 years ago it started getting worse and about 2 years ago I had to stop running and playing hockey.   I could still play but it was not enjoyable and i was generally really sore for a few days.   Over the past 18 months I have been able to be somewhat active but hips were definitely impacting things I liked to do.  I could ski but i like to telemark ski and I could barely bend enough to snap into bindings.  Got to the point where I would ask my ski partners to snap on my ski.    Putting on snowshoes was another struggle.   THis past summer doing simple stuff like mowing the lawn on a riding mower, It was painful to raise my leg to press brakes when sitting on the mower.   After much research,  I decided it was not worth waiting it out until I could not do much of anything.  I went to see a few surgeons and they all were directing me to THR.   I visited Dr. Gross and was pleased with his approach so decided to go the resurfacing route.   I am still really early in recovery but i can already see improvement in hip kinematics.   I have zero pain in the hip joint.   In fact, I have very litttle pain overall - legs are just weak. 

I have to say i had a lot of apprehension leading up to the surgery and even post-poned int once due to life conflicts.  So far I am very optimistic about the outcome and motived by others on this forum who provide guidance and their experience.   I know the next 5 months will take work and rehab but i am confident in the outcome.   Hope that helps.

Rn2md

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2019, 03:07:52 AM »
Hey,
Yeah itís definitely helpful to hear from someone who benefitted from the surgery prior to having significant disability. After reading many of the posts, many do seem to end up waiting until they can no longer do normal activities without pain. Yet they also basically say they wish they pulled the trigger sooner.
For me, I mostly notice symptoms during and for few days after impact or weightbeaeing activities, and like you, a couple of those got eliminated a couple of years ago. Running and martial arts were first, then squats, lunges, and deadlifts. I can do those things carefully and selectively but always pay a price for it in the subsequent days with pain and limping. Standing or walking more than a very short time now bring on the aches too.
I suppose I remain pretty active by most peopleís standards and since I stay away from or limit certain activities, most people probably donít notice any problem. If I remain mostly sedentary for a couple days, itís not bad at all. Those are the times when I wonder whether itís too soon. Then a strong reminder comes back when I begin to work out again.
The hip OA been a strong deterrent to exercise in general and the workouts I do have are rather uninspired, working well below what I know to be my true capability. and thatís really depressing.

I am definitely still less active than I would like to be, due to the hip OA and CAM impingement. And things will only get worse with time. At 41, I really dont like the idea of major surgery entailing permanent changes to major bones.
Yet I think this disease has already caused me some compromises on quality of life.
It does seem justifiable in some ways, yet ultimately unnecessary to intentionally wait long after the time you know you need the surgery. Since the time given up to the untreated disease while waiting can never be recovered.

It definitely takes courage to finally pull the trigger and stick with the decision. So congratulations to you.
Itís a wonderful thought to start living again now, not later!👍  :)

I will add my own success story here next month, also with Gross.


hernanu

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2019, 06:17:32 PM »

Congratulations on selecting a good surgeon and in continuing. One thing that can't be criticized is when people have the surgery done - I waited seven years of increasingly limited life until I decided.

Also another one that wishes I'd done it earlier, but c'est la vie.

I'm working on nine years post HR on both hips, and am active, healthy and any pains are outside of the hips.

Needless to say, I encourage taking the plunge, but not until you are ready. Good that you are ready to go.

Hernan, LHR 8/24/2010, RHR 11/29/2010 - Cormet, Dr. Snyder

Rn2md

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2019, 02:40:05 AM »
Agreed. Itís still a major surgery and one definitely needs to respect it as such.
Itís a shame that so many either never find out about resurfacing or else find out about it late in the spectrum of disease.

I would not have known to look into it if not for the 4th surgeon I saw for OA. He was a total hip replacement surgeon too, who didnít do resurfacing. He was the only one who actually mentioned resurfacing to me as a good option in experienced hands. Truly an unusual situation looking back at it now. Looking at posts from this forum, so many discerning people had to find out about resurfacing on their own, not liking the prospect of the THA being offered to them initially.

It wouldnít surprise me if part of the success of modern resurfacing comes from patient subpopulation that the procedure seems to select for.  If this forum is representative, it is a very discerning, healthy, determined, and intelligent group who Iím sure are very much on top of their health, recovery, and preparation. If you couple that select population with a procedure well done by an excellent surgeon, itís probably hard to go wrong.
Plus I agree with the logic that hip resurfacing is the more durable and physiologic way to go for a hip arthroplasty.

Just glad I was lucky enough to find out about this option in time. I will see for myself very soon.

I havenít even had the surgery yet but seeing the many success stories from real people here is so encouraging



MattJersey

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2019, 04:54:11 AM »
Just read this thread and it feels like reading my own deliberations. Different sports given up, but principally the same.

I found that doubts increased after I booked the op. I would have days when it didn't flare up after golf, so would be thinking maybe too soon for it, put it off, once done there is no going backwards etc.

But I went ahead (45 yo I was) and it has been great. (Apart from getting searched or body scanned every single time I go through airport now :) )

I hope, and expect, your results will be at least as satisfying.
28 April 2015, RBHR Mr McMinn

einreb

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2019, 03:57:45 PM »
I had mine done at 40.  At the time, I was trying to push off as long as possible given my relatively young age.

This last February marked 8 years and its been really good for me.  I completely underestimated what that chronic hip pain was doing to me in the years leading up to the surgery.  Its both physically and mentally exhausting.
40yo at the time of my 2/16/2011 left hip uncemented Biomet resurface with Tri Spike Acetabular cup by Gross

Rn2md

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2019, 02:52:58 AM »
Thank you

Itís especially great to hear from people around my age, 41, who had it done, and not necessarily when the symptoms became severe.
Mine is this upcoming Wednesday morning with Dr. Gross, for the outpatient option.
The perplexing thing for me is that my symptoms can be variable in severity and intermittent at times as well.
On my more sedentary days, I notice only mild symptoms, if any. Yet when standing, walking, running, or doing any kind of weight bearing, the symptoms become moderate or worse and can last for a day or two.

I suppose itís equally a lifestyle choice for me to have the surgery, as much as to avoid the moderate and nagging symptoms.
It would be nice to be ďbackĒ physically for the remainder of my prime years. My hip is limiting my ability to train hard enough to be at my best.  Itís time to address the weak link.
Iíll just be glad to have it over and done with.


blinky

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2019, 12:03:49 PM »
Best of luck to you. As someone who waited too long, I think you are doing it at the right time. Don't wait until it hurts all the time, including when you are at rest.

Pat Walter

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2019, 08:18:28 PM »
Good Luck Wednesday.  Looking forward to hearing how your recovery goes.


Pat
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3/15/06 LBHR De Smet

Philbrd

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2019, 12:30:26 AM »
hi Rn2md,
I was going through the same thoughts!  I am 6 weeks 3 days post op with dr. Gross (Bilat) and I cannot believe how good my hips feel. It is a very good feeling to not have restricted movement.   I'm still really early in my rehab but I see progress every day.   Once you get on the other side of the surgery you can focus on rehab.
Best of luck to you,


jimbone

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2019, 07:15:38 AM »
Rn2md=

First few days are a little rough around the edges.  As an athlete you'll be familiar with getting through pain,  This time you'll have prescription medication- use them as you need them and drop them when you can- you're doctor is only protecting you by making them available.  Do the hospital home PT exercises: ankle pumps, quad isometrics, heel slide [as able], abductors and bridges as able  Use ice and elevate, rest and heal.  Do some exercises every day as many times a day as you can.  There might be days you will do less- that's your body saying enough- give me a rest.  I found the first week the hospital PT and walking with first 2 and then 1 crutch and doing the hospital PT once or twice a day was a good balance getting back on my feet.  Did my first 250 yard outside walk with one crutch by day 6/7 [depending on which hip] and I was older and less athletic than you.  Push yourself only as far/fast as your body permits.   Dr. Gross has a sensible recovery program to follow and works for everyone I've heard that followed it.  Hope you're feeling well enough for a good report here soon.

hernanu

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2019, 01:15:32 PM »
Good luck this Wednesday, hope everything is good and you start anew.
Hernan, LHR 8/24/2010, RHR 11/29/2010 - Cormet, Dr. Snyder

catfriend

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2019, 04:25:30 AM »
I am willing to bet if there were a new poll asking who thought they had their hip resurfaced too soon the percentage answering yes would be zero, or very close to it.

rag33

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2019, 02:31:15 PM »
Same story as many others on here. I'm almost 4 months out and no regrets. I was becoming a miserable, grumpy and sleep deprived person. Over the past 6 years, I'd gone from running 1/2 marathons to not being able to tie my shoes. I had to stop running after I got cortisone injections because it was so painful. Turns out the inflammation was keeping the pain away. I had a very difficult 2 months over the summer after over doing it with a walk...and that was enough for me. I wrote an email to Dr. De Smet in the middle of a painful sleepless night and 2 months later I was getting operated on. Just waking up from surgery, I could feel the difference. The constant, deep pain was gone and replaced by surgical pain that I knew would go away.
Right Conserve+, November 21, 2018, Dr. De Smet

Rn2md

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2019, 12:38:47 AM »
Well, I took the plunge for the outpatient resurfacing by Dr. Gross earlier today.
All was a great success and happy with how everything went.  Currently resting up at the hotel with pain controlled.
Just visited by the visiting nurse as well...just when I thought i couldnít be any more impressed.

Five stars all the way around for Dr. Gross and team.

Hope to have a speedy recovery.

Pat Walter

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #17 on: March 21, 2019, 12:52:19 AM »
Congratulations on your new hip resurfacing.  I look forward to reading about your recovery.


Would you please start your new hip resurfacing story under Patient Stories. That way people can more easily follow your story.


Thanks and good luck.


Pat
Webmaster/Owner of Surface Hippy
3/15/06 LBHR De Smet

hernanu

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #18 on: March 21, 2019, 04:13:16 PM »
Excellent. Keep us up to date, good luck on the rehab.
Hernan, LHR 8/24/2010, RHR 11/29/2010 - Cormet, Dr. Snyder

Mouse Potato

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Re: Deciding on pulling the trigger for surgery
« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2019, 09:40:08 AM »
Hello everyone,

This is my first post so thought I would share in this thread.  For me, the final decision to have my (right) hip resurfaced came when I was struggling to complete a round of golf because of the pain. I am just about able to complete 18 holes if I load up on tablets but I am losing the enjoyment and am practically dragging my leg for the 2nd 9 holes. I am in severe discomfort afterwards and can barely move after enjoying a post round pint!  Also, I am unable to place my body in the right set up position because the pain is too great so I am swinging from a more comfortable position which is causing significant swing faults.  My handicap has crept up from 11 to 17 over the last 4-5 years as a consequence.

First signs of OA in my hip were about 11 years ago at age 41.  I was a keen footballer (Soccer to the peeps across the pond) but noticed sharp pains when stretching for the ball.  My Dr diagnosed OA and subsequent X-rays showed I have shallow hip sockets, inherited from my mother, which was the root cause of the problems.  My mother had her first THR at age 46.

I am unable to walk fast, let alone run and I walk with a pronounced limp which has been the cause of much mirth amongst my friends.  They are all pleased for me that I am taking the plunge because they can see the pain that I am in.

Anyway, I am scheduled for the operation next Friday 29th March, with Mr Treacy at the Priory Hospital, Edgbaston Birmingham (UK).  I have been absolutely petrified of the operation, which is why I have put it off for so long but I am actually looking forward to the other side now, which is why I know it is the right time.  The pain has always been manageable hence I have put up with it, but the last couple of months have been a struggle.

Mr Treacy thinks, looking at the X-rays, that I should have had the operation about 2-3 years ago because my bones are showing the stress.  He said just rest and walking for the first 4-5 weeks, with no PT at all.  Surprisingly, he said I should be able to pick a golf club up again at around 8 weeks.

Anyway, enough waffle and thanks for reading if you got this far!

Russ

 

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