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Author Topic: Lateral Movement  (Read 276 times)

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blinky

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Lateral Movement
« on: April 10, 2019, 01:49:51 PM »
Looking for some help with lateral movement.

I am three and a half years out, bilateral. I have no problem moving in straight lines back and forth, running, swimming, cycling, walking, but have pain and soreness after too much lateral movement. For me that would mean dancing, for you that might mean tennis or basketball. I am sure part of my problem is just doing it in excess after not doing it. I am in good shape, so will throw myself into some class, feel great, then be sore the next day because I normally don't move laterally.

Ideas on how to adapt? Besides taking it more slowly?!?! (You can tell me to do that, too.)

John C

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Re: Lateral Movement
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2019, 02:59:55 PM »
My experience is that much of the recovery from these surgeries involves focusing on building strength in lateral movements. My guess is that if you were to begin a structured and gradual program focusing on this, it might solve the problems. Some basic exercises that you might explore would be clam shells, lateral leg raises, side stepping with exercise bands around your knees or ankles, cable weights in the gym, and lateral agility drills. Maybe one or two visits to a knowledgable PT to help you set up a focused program might be a great start. A couple of my main sports, skiing and tennis, both involve a lot of lateral movements, and I have found that a diligent program can allow strong lateral movements without problems.
John/ Left uncemented Biomet/ Dr Gross/ 6-16-08
Right uncemented Biomet/Dr Gross/ 4/25/18

jimbone

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Re: Lateral Movement
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2019, 06:48:51 PM »
Excellent advice provided by John C.  Lateral and diagonal stepping with resistance bands was what was prescribed by my PT with a good result.  Surprising how challenging it can be.  Band placement at the ankles increases the strength needed- so a tougher work out.  I've begun using a Bosu ball for squats and have found it developed a feeling of much greater stability in the hips after a relatively short time.

John C

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Re: Lateral Movement
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2019, 02:56:29 PM »
+1 on the value of using a Bosu Ball for stability as well as balance and strength in all planes. Two legged squats are a great place to start, and then moving to one legged squats as long as a person is far enough out from surgery for falling off the ball to not be an issue. On of the most fun exercises with my PT at a few months post surgery was one legged on the Bosu, and then throwing and catching a heavy medicine ball.  For skiers, adding ski poles is great as a balance aid for one legged work, and can evolve into some great technique drills. Any drills on one leg will really help the lateral stabilizers to fire.
John/ Left uncemented Biomet/ Dr Gross/ 6-16-08
Right uncemented Biomet/Dr Gross/ 4/25/18

jimbone

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Re: Lateral Movement
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2019, 03:54:11 PM »
I like the suggestion for ski poles.  I've only been doing the Bosu squats for a few weeks now and haven't felt strong enough to do one legged work on it due to a lack of stability.  I'll give it a try with the trecking poles and see.  Early on, one legged balancing was a big help in regaining strength and stability.  Overall I'm pretty certain Blinky is well past beginner exercises from what I've read in her posts.  An exercise I used to do before the arthritis really encroached was the "Candlestick" and a side to side version of the same.  Roll your legs up over your head while lying on your back, then keeping the core drawn tight and strong, with the back straight, lower the legs toward the floor ahead of the hips and butt.  The side to side version is the same except you lower the hips to each side without going all the way to the floor.  Very core challenging and requires a lot of lateral strength as well.  Holding oneself parallel to the floor from a vertical pole/object works most of the same muscles.  I've been wanting to get back to this and feel like I am getting close- within the month I'm thinking.  Let us know what you find that works Blinky- always looking for a new excuse to get better.

blinky

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Re: Lateral Movement
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2019, 05:41:38 PM »
Thanks, guys. Maybe I should go back to those easy, early exercises and see if there are any glaring weaknesses, then advance to the bands and the Bosu and the advanced one legged exercises.

Maybe I have been getting complacent. It could be, too, that I was lucky and some spin classes I have done have ended with weights, bands, etc and offered me just enough lateral strengthening I could get away with being lazy.

 

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